Latest Blog Posts https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog Latest Blog Posts for Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture en Rwanda Postharvest Week incubates visionary postharvest solutions https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/rwanda-postharvest-week-incubates-visionary-postharvest-solutions <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Rwanda Postharvest Week incubates visionary postharvest solutions</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/IMG_8989.JPG" width="3000" height="2000" alt="Niyidukunda Mugeni Euphrosine of Avo Healthy Oil Company grins and holds a giant check showing her award money from the competition, next to two other competitors." title="Niyidukunda Mugeni Euphrosine, one of 13 Postharvest Innovation Competition winners, will use award money to purchase processing equipment for her avocado oil extracting company. She also makes soaps and avocado flour. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photos by Rashmi Ekka/Agribusiness Associates)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5336" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Corey Rodda</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 13, 2018</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="heading--underline"><span><span><span><span>Training sessions, conference and innovation competition highlight entrepreneurial opportunities for reducing postharvest losses</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>A Horticulture Innovation Lab team hosted the first-ever “Rwanda Postharvest Week,” in Kigali recently, with five days of training and conference events culminating in the Postharvest Innovation Competition. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Winners of the competition were 13 burgeoning enterprises that received a cumulative total of $50,000 (44,054,000 Rwandan francs or RWF) in seed funding for their postharvest technologies and start-up businesses. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Other events during Rwanda Postharvest Week included a conference attended by 100 people and a two-day postharvest training for agronomists and farming cooperative leaders. The week also included a parallel event organized by the Postharvest Education Foundation, which held a two-day workshop to graduate 33 new postharvest trainers from its year-long e-learning course. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span>Entrepreneurs win funding to scale-up value-added products, waste-reducing services</span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The competition’s winning projects ran the gamut from a traditional chili sauce made from habanero chilies, ginger, garlic and rosemary to a cold storage service provider. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Other prize-winning ventures include a jam made from tamarillo or tree tomato, instant porridge concocted out of carrots and beet roots and a pumpkin oil company that seeks to employ youth. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Competition participants ranged from start-ups in the product development stage to young businesses that have already launched a product in the market. Innovations were judged based on their economic opportunity, value to customers, place in the value chain and financial sustainability.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Several jars of Primo Chili Sauce" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="8fcf0bef-5d6a-46bb-9c4a-13858e2e0de1" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/IMG_2282.JPG" /><figcaption>Primo Chili Sauce made by Green Treasure is marketed as a secret family recipe. The chili sauce company won RWF 4,380,000 to purchase chili oil processing equipment.</figcaption></figure><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Contestants started their participation in the competition two months earlier, submitting an executive summary of their postharvest innovation and attending an agribusiness development training led by Gurbinder Gill. Gill is an international expert in agribusiness development, marketing and business cycles and leads the Horticulture Innovation Lab “Reducing Postharvest Loss in Rwanda” project. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Semi-finalists were selected and then attended a workshop to hone their ability to create professionally polished and persuasive “pitch deck” slideshows to pitch their innovation to investors. For the second round of the competition, they were asked to submit a pitch deck and financial projections for their enterprise. From the third and final round, thirteen contestants were selected to receive seed money for their innovations and received coaching on pitching their decks. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span>Then during Postharvest Week, the 13 contestants presented at the Postharvest Conference and</span><span> vied for an additional $2,000 in funding at the pitch competition. Akanyana Sharon won the popular vote and additional funding with her Ishyo Foods and tamarillo fruit jam.</span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Multiple jars of Tomato Tree Fruit Jam" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d7dc7a32-45bc-4a2c-aef5-f5cd9836770f" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/IMG_2284.JPG" /><figcaption>Akanyana Sharon of Ishyo Foods won the popular vote during the pitch competition at Rwanda Postharvest Week by pitching her tree tomato fruit jam to the audience.</figcaption></figure><h3><span><span><span><span>Postharvest Innovation Competition winners highlighted</span></span></span></span></h3> <p><span><span><span><span>Competition winners were awarded in three different stages of innovation.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong>Innovators in the “Acceleration Stage”</strong> have a product that has already been introduced to the market and are ready to accelerate the growth:</span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><strong>Elyse Habumukiza</strong> of Ingabeyacu Social Enterprise won RWF 4,380,000 or the equivalent of $5,000 USD. Ingabeyacu Social Enterprise manufactures Kero Instant Porridge, crafted out of carrots, beetroots and other vegetables. Habumukiza will use his winnings to purchase equipment to make the porridge. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Niyidukunda Mugeni Euphrosine</strong> of Avo Healthy Oil Company received RWF 4,380,000. Avo Healthy Oil Company extracts avocado oil and makes avocado soaps and avocado flour. Euphrosine will use the money to purchase processing equipment. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Petit Vuningoma </strong>of Green Treasure received RWF 4,380,000. Green Treasure produces Primo, a spicy chili sauce crafted out of habanero chili, garlic, ginger and rosemary. Vuningoma will use the money to pay for chili processing equipment.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Dieudonne Twahirwa</strong> of Gashora Farm Ltd. received RWF 4,380,000. Gashora Farm Ltd. processes chilies and makes Didi’s Chili Oil. Twahirwa will use his winnings to purchase chili processing equipment.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Several competition winners with large checks pose for a photo" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="7b40edce-c1ec-4327-b259-af02c5f1b9db" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/IMG_8976.jpg" /><figcaption>Postharvest competition winners show off their newfound agribusiness funding</figcaption></figure><p><span><span><span><span><strong>Innovators in the “Growth Stage”</strong> have a product on the market and are in the process of building business models poised for success:</span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><strong>Seraphin Niyonsenga </strong>of Agrifood Business Consulting Ltd. received RWF 3,504,000. Agrifood Business Consulting Ltd. seeks to improve access to the DryCard and chimney solar dryer. Niyonsenga will use the money for machinery and training.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Serge Ganza </strong>of Africa Food Supply Ltd. received RWF 3,504,000. Africa Food Supply Ltd. is working to solve postharvest loss by providing postharvest transportation services. Ganza will use his winnings to purchase crates and pay for transportation services. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Fraterne Manishimwe</strong> of Sanejo Youth Ltd. received RWF 3,504,000. Sanejo Youth Ltd. is a social enterprise that aims to provide employment opportunities for youth while processing pumpkin oil and making pumpkin baked goods. Manishimwe will use the money to pay for equipment. </span></span></span></span></li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span><strong>Innovators in the “Nurturing Stage” </strong>are in the early stage of business with a product prototype and are planning to test their business model:</span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><strong>Gakwaya Titus </strong>of TKEA Engineering &amp; Agrotechnology, a CoolBot installation and rental company, received RWF 2,628,000. He will use the money to purchase CoolBots for his company.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Akanyana Sharon</strong> of Ishyo Foods which manufactures tamarillo fruit jam received RWF 2,628,000 and also received RWF 1,752,000 for her winning pitch at the conference. She will use her winnings to purchase equipment. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Furaha Minga</strong> of Kigali Tomato Industry Ltd. received RWF 2,628,000. Kigali Tomato Industry Ltd. is a tomato processing company currently focused on manufacturing tomato paste. Minga will use the money to purchase tomato processing equipment. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Lilliose Umubyeyi </strong>of Lite Company Ltd. received RWF 2,190,000. Lite Company Ltd. manufactures mushroom soup powder and mushroom cookies. Umubyeyi will use the money to purchase processing equipment. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Juvenal Kabagambe</strong> of Urban and Rural Farming Development Company Ltd. (URFDC) received RWF 2,190,000. URFDC provides food gardening and agro-extension services and is currently in the process of developing technologies to combat postharvest losses. Kabagambe will use the winnings to purchase tools and pay for prototyping. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><strong>Gaudence Nishimwe</strong> of Organic Edible Coating Company Ltd. received RWF 1,752,000 to conduct experiments on the efficacy of her aloe vera-based food preservative.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul><h3><span><span><strong><span><span>Reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda</span></span></strong></span></span></h3> <p><span><span><span><span>The events of Rwanda Postharvest Week and the Postharvest Innovation Competition were hosted by a Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture project focused on reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The team has also established three Postharvest Training and Services Centers in Rwanda, one at the University of Rwanda, another at the Rwanda Agriculture Board and a third at the National Agricultural Export Board. The events, centers and other training activities are designed to build capacity among agriculturists and entrepreneurs, ultimately strengthening the postharvest sector in Rwanda.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The project’s research team has also evaluated postharvest losses in Rwanda across the value chains of tomatoes, green chilies, sweet potatoes and green bananas. Each postharvest loss assessment identifies why postharvest loss occurs and where it is occurring, combining three methodologies of analysis.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h3><span><span>More information:</span></span></h3> <ul><li><strong><span><span>Project information: </span></span></strong><span><span><a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/project/postharvest-losses-rwanda">Reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda</a> </span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong>More on the innovation competition:</strong> <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/rwanda-postharvest-innovation-competition-begins">Rwanda Postharvest Innovation Competition begins</a> </span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong>Report: </strong><a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/information/postharvest-loss-assessment-tomatoes-rwanda">Postharvest Loss Assessment of Tomatoes in Rwanda</a> </span></span></li> <li><strong>Report:</strong> <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/information/postharvest-loss-assessment-orange-fleshed-sweet-potatoes-rwanda">Postharvest Loss Assessment of Orange-Fleshed Sweet Potatoes in Rwanda</a></li> <li><strong>Report:</strong> <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/information/postharvest-loss-assessment-green-chilies-rwanda">Postharvest Loss Assessment of Green Chilies in Rwanda</a></li> <li><strong>Report:</strong> <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/information/postharvest-loss-assessment-green-bananas-rwanda">Postharvest Loss Assessment of Green Bananas in Rwanda</a></li> <li><span><span><strong>Blog post:</strong><a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/6-lessons-postharvest-loss-assessments-rwanda"> 6 lessons from postharvest loss assessments in Rwanda</a> </span></span></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/postharvest-practices" hreflang="en">Postharvest practices</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/program-news" hreflang="en">Program News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/rwanda" hreflang="en">Rwanda</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 13 Sep 2018 18:11:19 +0000 Corey Rodda 6371 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Internships: Join team helping farmers in Guinea https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/internships-guinea-2018 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Internships: Join team helping farmers in Guinea</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/20170905_114200-avenir-guinea-horticutlure-innovation-lab-edsWeb3.jpg" width="1200" height="792" alt="Young entrepreneur with vegetable seedling nursery" title="Mamadou Kann shows off a vegetable seedling nursery at the Horticulture Training and Services Center, established by the Horticulture Innovation Lab with the Institut de Recherche Agronomique de Guinée. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Gabriel Wyland/UC Davis)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">June 07, 2018</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2 class="heading--underline"><span><span>Travel to West Africa. </span></span><span><span>Join a young entrepreneurial team. </span></span><span><span>Support farmers. </span></span><span><span>Thrive through challenges.</span></span></h2> <p><span><span>Graduate students and recent graduates who are interested in working with farmers in West Africa are in luck: the Horticulture Innovation Lab project in Guinea is looking for a few great interns to join the team.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The team is establishing a <a href="/project/guinea-center">new, youth-led Horticulture Training and Services Center</a> that promotes horticultural practices to farmers with the help of young entrepreneurs. This internship opportunity will support 4-6 interns from U.S. universities or from the Panamerican Agricultural School, Zamorano, to work with the Horticulture Innovation Lab staff along with local entrepreneurs, extension agents, undergraduate student interns from Honduras, and Peace Corps volunteers.</span></span></p> <aside class="wysiwyg-feature-block u-width--half u-align--right"><h3 class="wysiwyg-feature-block__title"><span><span>Apply for internships by July 1</span></span></h3> <div class="wysiwyg-feature-block__body"> <p>Graduate students and recent graduates from U.S. universities as well as from the Panamerican Agricultural School, Zamorano, in Honduras are invited to apply for internships in Guinea with the Horticulture Innovation Lab. Internships will last 1-4 months during the summer or fall, to support training and demonstrations at a new horticulture center.</p> <p><span><span>To apply, candidates must submit a short application along with one-page statement on why this opportunity fits into their goals through the Horticulture Innovation Lab's <a href="https://rfx.piestar.com/opportunities/horticulture-innovation-lab-at-u-c-davis/rfp/53">online application portal</a> by July 1, 2018, or until internship positions are filled. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Full details are in the <strong><a href="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/imapct_story_files/Internship-description-guinea-180608v3.pdf">Guinea internship application description</a> (PDF)</strong>.</span></span></p> <p>Please consider sharing this opportunity with graduate students and recent graduates who might be interested.</p> <p>Questions? Please contact <a href="/people/gabriel-wyland">Gabriel Wyland</a>, gkwyland@ucdavis.edu.</p> </div> </aside><p><span><span>Interns will help establish technology demonstrations at the center, which is located on the campus of the <em>Institut de Recherche Agronomique de Guinée</em> (IRAG) in Kindia, Guinea. They will also help develop training courses and assist local agents in training Guinean youth, farmers, and agricultural processors. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Candidates should have substantial experience in agriculture, horticulture or agribusiness. Desired qualifications include the ability to work in French, experience in farm production, knowledge of postharvest technologies, and/or experience in international development work. <strong>See <a href="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/imapct_story_files/Internship-description-guinea-180608v3.pdf">full Guinea internship application description</a> (PDF). </strong></span></span></p> <h3><span><span>Travel supported, but expect challenging living conditions</span></span></h3> <p><span><span>Positions are available for 1-4 months, beginning as early as July. Positions can also be arranged to start later in the fall, as long as they begin by Dec. 31, 2018. Though the internships are officially unpaid, interns will be provided travel to and from Guinea, housing and local transportation, in addition to receiving per diem payments for additional living costs. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Another important qualification for this position is the ability to live in a challenging environment, where running water and electricity are not always guaranteed. Interns should be prepared to encounter challenging living and working conditions, including slow and difficult local travel, problems with running water, and interruptions in electricity.</span></span></p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Young women lay out pineapple slices in a chimney solar dryer" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ed2e08ce-e300-4684-a847-5cde664e0c38" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/IMG_20171023_145428-solar-dryer-pineapple-guinea-horticulture-innovation-lab-forWeb.jpg" /><figcaption>Laying out pineapple slices in a chimney solar dryer demonstration at the Horticulture Training and Services Center in Kindia, Guinea. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Gabriel Wyland/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><h3> </h3> <h3><span><span>Fruit and vegetable research, opportunities in Guinea</span></span></h3> <p><span><span>The Horticulture Innovation Lab began working in Guinea in the wake of the Ebola outbreak, when its researchers were tasked with evaluating local fruit and vegetable production as part of long-term recovery response by the U.S. Agency for International Development.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>A resulting USAID-funded report, the <a href="/blog/new-report-horticulture-guinea-after-ebola">Rapid Assessment of Horticulture in Guinea</a>, made recommendations for improving Guinea's horticulture sector, including opportunities related to entrepreneurship, training, and postharvest practices. The report also specifically examined important local horticultural crops, including chili pepper, okra, eggplant, tomato, mango and orange.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>That work grew into a project funded by the USAID/Guinea mission <a href="/blog/opening-center-horticulture-innovations-guinea">to establish and open a Horticulture Training and Services Center</a>, with leadership from young entrepreneurs who are part of the AVENIR program (<em>Agents en Vulgarisation, Entrepreneuriat et Innovation Rurale</em>, or “agents of extension, entrepreneurship and rural innovation") with Feed the Future Guinea Agricultural Services</span></span>.</p> <p><em>The Horticulture Innovation Lab's global research network advances fruit and vegetable innovations, empowering smallholder farmers to earn more income while better nourishing their communities. The program is led by <span><span>a team at the University of California, Davis, with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development, as part of the U.S. government’s global Feed the Future initiative.</span></span></em></p> <p> </p> <h3><span><span>Internship details:</span></span></h3> <ul><li><span><span>For full details, see <a href="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/imapct_story_files/Internship-description-guinea-180608v3.pdf">Guinea Internship Application Description</a> (PDF)</span></span></li> <li><span><span>Apply in our <a href="https://rfx.piestar.com/opportunities/horticulture-innovation-lab-at-u-c-davis/rfp/53">online application portal</a> </span></span></li> </ul><h3><span><span>More information:</span></span></h3> <ul><li><span><span>Project details: <a href="/project/guinea-center">Establishing a horticulture center in Guinea</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span>More about the <a href="countries/guinea">Horticulture Innovation Lab's work in Guinea</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span>Report: <a href="/blog/new-report-horticulture-guinea-after-ebola">Rapid Assessment of Horticulture in Guinea</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span>Blog post: <a href="/blog/young-entrepreneurs-help-guineas-farmers-access-postharvest-innovation">Young entrepreneurs help Guinea’s farmers access postharvest innovation</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span>Video: <a href="/information/meet-fatoumata-cissoko-entrepreneur-and-innovator">Meet Fatoumata Cissoko, entrepreneur and innovator</a></span></span></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/training-and-extension" hreflang="en">Training and extension</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/opportunities" hreflang="en">Opportunities</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students" hreflang="en">students</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/guinea" hreflang="en">Guinea</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/united-states" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/honduras" hreflang="en">Honduras</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 07 Jun 2018 23:58:42 +0000 Brenda Dawson 5716 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu DryCard team honored as 'Innovators of the Year' https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/drycard-2018-innovators-year-award <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">DryCard team honored as &#039;Innovators of the Year&#039;</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/20180502-dry-card-6083-cropforweb.jpg" width="1224" height="918" alt="DryCards in containers, one with peanuts that are damp and the other with dry coffee." title="DryCards change color to indicate whether a product is dry enough to store safely, shown here with peanuts and coffee beans." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 31, 2018</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span>The Horticulture Innovation Lab team that invented the DryCard™ and has been working over the last year to introduce this low-cost dryness indicator to the world was honored by the UC Davis Chancellor's Innovation Awards earlier this month. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>The team — made up of Michael Reid, James Thompson, Elizabeth Mitcham, Anthony Phan, Angelos Deltsidis, Archie Jarman, Brenda Dawson and others from the Horticulture Innovation Lab — was one of two recipients of the 2018 Innovators of the Year award, which includes a $10,000 prize for university research and outreach efforts. </span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span>Read more about the <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-innovators-honored-contributions-agriculture-pathology">UC Davis Chancellor's Innovation Awards recipients</a>.</span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span>“These honorees reflect the growing importance of UC Davis as an incubator and promoter of innovation, not just in the Sacramento region, but in the world,” said UC Davis Provost Ralph J. Hexter, according to a <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-innovators-honored-contributions-agriculture-pathology">UC Davis press release</a>. “They are groundbreakers in finding new ways to feed the world, build community and develop technology that creates a better tomorrow for all.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span>To circulate news of the award, UC Davis also created a 2-minute <a href="https://youtu.be/uiM-8-MlpyE">video</a> about the creation of the DryCard, as 2018 Innovator of the Year. </span></span></p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 56.25%"><iframe width="480" height="270" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uiM-8-MlpyE?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <h3><span><span>Like a thermometer, but for dried food storage</span></span></h3> <p><span><span>During the award ceremony on May 15, Michael Reid, James Thompson and Elizabeth Mitcham provided comments in accepting the award.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>"Our program's goals are advanced by the work of many experts at UC Davis, other U.S. universities and developing country scientists. We're especially proud to work with such innovative scientists at UC Davis as Michael Reid and Jim Thompson," said Mitcham, as director of the Horticulture Innovation Lab in accepting the award. She also highlighted Anthony Phan's work in fostering entrepreneurs in developing countries to manufacture and sell the DryCard.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Thompson noted that the DryCard is "the crucial tool that has been missing" when it comes to measuring dryness in food systems.</span></span></p> <blockquote> <p><span><span>"Just as a thermometer is used to manage the temperature of perishable food in the cold chain, the DryCard allows people to manage the dryness of durable food in the dry chain," Thompson said during the ceremony. </span></span></p> </blockquote> <p><span><span>"The DryCard is reusable, inherently accurate, and simple enough to be made and sold by local entrepreneurs. It has the potential to be a sustainable and easy-to-use tool to improve the health of millions of people, especially people living in the humid tropics," Thompson said.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Reid highlighted the role of Bertha Mjawa in Tanzania in becoming one of the first entrepreneurs to begin producing and marketing the DryCard in her own country—and noted the award's prize funds could further similar efforts.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>"This prize provides us with the opportunity to identify and fund more entrepreneurs like her and spread this card around the world where it will be used for preventing this toxic contamination of foods," Reid said.</span></span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img"><img alt="DryCard team with their 2018 Innovators of the Year awards" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="650297c4-8ef6-47d1-bb91-43922fb07549" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/innovators-of-the-year-2018-drycard-uc-davis-forwebsite.jpg" /><figcaption>From left, the DryCard team of Anthony Phan, Elizabeth Mitcham, Michael Reid, Archie Jarman and James Thompson pose with awards from the UC Davis Chancellor's Innovation Awards. </figcaption></figure><h3><span><span>Working with entrepreneurs to market DryCards in Africa, Asia, Central America</span></span></h3> <p><span><span>Since launching the DryCard in 2017, the Horticulture Innovation Lab team has built up a network of independent entrepreneurs and small businesses who have helped to manufacture, sell and distribute more than 10,000 DryCards in places such as Tanzania, Rwanda, Ghana, Guinea, Mexico, Guatemala and Thailand.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Representatives from a number of organizations and institutions have also requested samples of the DryCard to test and introduce via their work in local communities — including FAO, USDA, USAID, CIMMYT, Catholic Relief Services, International Relief Committee and Mercy Corps.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>So far, the DryCard team at the Horticulture Innovation Lab is working with a basic business model that includes providing materials for entrepreneurs and small businesses to make their first 10,000 DryCards which they can sell for a profit. The team provides ongoing technical support related to use and production of the DryCards and tracks sales information globally. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>For more information about getting DryCard samples or partnering with the DryCard team, visit <a href="http://drycard.ucdavis.edu">http://drycard.ucdavis.edu</a>. </span></span></p> <h3><span><span>More information:</span></span></h3> <ul><li><span><span><strong>UC Davis article and video:</strong><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/food/news/dry-card-a-low-cost-solution-to-reduce-food-waste"> DryCard Invention Wins Chancellor’s Innovators Award to Reduce Food Loss Globally</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong>Award press release: </strong><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-innovators-honored-contributions-agriculture-pathology">UC Davis Innovators Honored for Contributions in Agriculture, Pathology</a> </span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="http://drycard.ucdavis.edu/">More information about the DryCard</a>, including sign-ups for partnerships and samples</span></span></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/program-news" hreflang="en">Program News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/awards" hreflang="en">awards</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/videos-multimedia" hreflang="en">Videos &amp; Multimedia</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-technology field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Technology</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/drycard" hreflang="en">DryCard</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 31 May 2018 17:08:53 +0000 Brenda Dawson 5576 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Rwanda Postharvest Innovation Competition begins https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/rwanda-postharvest-innovation-competition-begins <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Rwanda Postharvest Innovation Competition begins</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/IMGP5581-eds-for-web.jpg" width="1300" height="861" alt="Bin of tomatoes on ground in a market in Rwanda" title="The competition focuses on early-stage innovations that can improve postharvest management of perishable food crops, including tomatoes and other fruits, vegetables, roots, tubers and edible fungi. (Photo by Jesse Daystar)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 03, 2018</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2 class="heading--underline"><span><span>Calling all innovators in Rwanda:<br /> Postharvest Innovation Competition heats up</span></span></h2> <p>A new innovation competition focused on emerging postharvest technologies has started in Rwanda, with cash awards totaling $50,000 (USD) available to selected winners.</p> <p><span><span>Individuals and organizations working in Rwanda are invited to participate in the "Rwanda Postharvest Innovation Competition," which focuses on practical technologies that help reduce postharvest losses of perishable crops (including fruits, vegetables, roots, tubers and edible fungi) or that save labor during postharvest management. Entries will be judged on a combination of business potential and likelihood of success.</span></span></p> <h3><span><span>Winners to be featured at postharvest conference in July</span></span></h3> <p><span><span>May 25 is the deadline to enter the preliminary round of the competition, which requires a brief executive summary using a provided template. Potential participants are also invited to attend a voluntary information session on May 15, at 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. or 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. at the Mulindi Agrishow Ground at the Main Meeting Room.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>A second, semi-final round will include the creation of a "pitch deck" of PowerPoint slides and a spreadsheet of financial projects. All semi-finalists will be invited to participate in a workshop to improve their pitch decks on June 6, 2018.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The final round of competition will culminate with the top eight entrepreneurs presenting their pitches at the Rwanda Postharvest Conference, which will be held July 18, 2018, in Kigali, Rwanda. Top innovators will be provided cash prizes up to $5,000-$10,000 each, in addition to accelerated business training on scaling up their innovations.</span></span></p> <h3><span><span>Connecting innovators, investors and mentors to scale up postharvest innovations</span></span></h3> <p><span><span>The aim of the Rwanda Postharvest Innovation Competition is to showcase Rwanda's best emerging postharvest technologies and innovations with potential for scale-up. The competition also seeks to establish and strengthen linkages between innovators, potential investors and mentors to facilitate up-scaling of innovations with the goal of reducing postharvest losses of horticultural crops.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The Rwanda Postharvest Innovation Competition and the associated Rwanda Postharvest Conference are hosted by a Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture project focused on <a href="/project/postharvest-losses-rwanda">reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda</a>. The team includes institutional partners from the University of Rwanda, National Agricultural Export Development Board, Rwanda Agriculture Board, and Agribusiness Associates with guidance from Rwanda's Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Resources. The project and competition are supported by the <a href="/">Horticulture Innovation Lab</a>, with leadership from the University of California, Davis, and funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development as part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative called <a href="http://feedthefuture.gov">Feed the Future</a>.</span></span></p> <h3><span><span>Competition starts now with executive summaries and agribusiness training </span></span></h3> <p><span><span>The competition has started, with an initial training offered on May 15-16 and preliminary entries due by May 25. Please see the Rwanda Postharvest Innovation Competition packet for additional details and templates. All competition entries must be sent to Serge Ndayitabi at <a href="mailto:serge.ndayitabi@agribusinessassociates.com?subject=Postharvest%20Innovation%20Competition%20Entry">serge.ndayitabi@agribusinessassociates.com</a> with "Postharvest Innovation Competition Entry" in the email subject line.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Additional questions? Please contact <a href="mailto:serge.ndayitabi@agribusinessassociates.com?subject=Postharvest%20Innovation%20Competition%20Entry">serge.ndayitabi@agribusinessassociates.com</a>.</span></span></p> <h3> </h3> <h3><span><span>More information:</span></span></h3> <ul><li><span><span><strong><a href="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/imapct_story_files/Rwanda%20Postharvest%20Innovation%20Competition%20Complete%20Packet.pdf">Rwanda Postharvest Innovation Competition packet</a></strong> (PDF)</span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/imapct_story_files/PIC%20Round%201%20Application%20Form.docx">Template Round 1 Application form</a> (docx)</span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/imapct_story_files/PIC%20Round%202%20Application.pptx">Template Round 2 Pitch deck</a> (pptx)</span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong>More information about this project: </strong><a href="/project/postharvest-losses-rwanda">Reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda</a></span></span></li> <li><a href="/countries/rwanda"><strong>More about the Horticulture Innovation Lab in Rwanda</strong></a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/postharvest-practices" hreflang="en">Postharvest practices</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/opportunities" hreflang="en">Opportunities</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/rwanda" hreflang="en">Rwanda</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 03 May 2018 20:42:25 +0000 Brenda Dawson 5421 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu UC Davis expert judges fresh produce quality on ABC News https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/uc-davis-expert-judges-fresh-produce-quality-abc-news <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">UC Davis expert judges fresh produce quality on ABC News</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/fresh-produce-quality-vegetables-825w.png" width="825" height="297" alt="fresh fruits and vegetables - peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, lemons, and more" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">April 06, 2018</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><a href="/people/elizabeth-mitcham">Elizabeth Mitcham</a>, postharvest extension specialist in the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences and director of the Horticulture Innovation Lab, shared her expertise on fresh produce quality during a segment on ABC News’ Good Morning America today.</p> <p>If you missed it, you can watch the segment here:</p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 56.25%"><video poster="https://s.abcnews.com/images/GMA/180406_gma_worley2_0813_16x9_992.jpg" width="640" height="360" controls=""><source src="https://abcnewsvod-a.akamaihd.net/playback/abcnews/2018/04/2018/04/180406_gma_worley_0813_700.mp4"></source></video></div> <p><a href="http://www.beckyworley.com/">Becky Worley</a>, ABC News technology and consumer correspondent, led the segment, comparing three same-day delivery services by placing simultaneous orders and judging the results.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Beth Mitcham, UC Davis, portrait" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="368c824b-95be-4288-9c11-bc876ec7b9f0" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/Mitcham-Beth-rgb-1inW-300dpi-forBlog-214x300.jpg" /><figcaption>Elizabeth Mitcham, director of the Horticulture Innovation Lab</figcaption></figure><p>As a fruit and vegetable expert, Mitcham was invited to assess the quality of the fresh produce after it was delivered. The produce orders included bananas, asparagus, blueberries, bell peppers, romaine lettuce, tomatoes, avocados, cucumbers and grapes.</p> <p>Mitcham pointed out some squishy bell peppers, damaged bananas, and wilted lettuce, but found the produce was mostly in good condition when it arrived — and gave the deliveries “A” and “B+” grades.</p> <p>“Overall I’m pretty impressed with this,” she said during the television piece.</p> <p>For Mitcham, the experience also posed an interesting question about produce delivery services: How will grocery delivery services account for consumer personal preferences related to ripeness? The avocados in these deliveries made this point clear.</p> <p>“The avocados from the three stores varied widely in ripeness. Avocados from one store arrived mostly ripe, from another store were partly ripe and would be ready to eat in a day or two, but the avocados from the third store would require 3-4 days to ripen on a kitchen counter,” Mitcham said. “In the future, delivery services may consider adding a ‘ripe’ option for products like avocados, but then they would need to package the groceries more carefully.”</p> <h2>How to keep fruits and vegetables fresh and safe at home</h2> <p>Mitcham pointed out that how consumers care for their produce at home, after they’ve purchased it from a grocery store (or delivery service) can make a difference in maintaining produce freshness, quality and taste.</p> <p>The UC Postharvest Technology Center, where Mitcham’s work focuses on postharvest biology for California agriculture, has a useful flyer for people to stick to their refrigerators. <a href="http://ucanr.edu/sites/Postharvest_Technology_Center_/files/230110.pdf">Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables for Better Taste</a> (PDF) lists fruits and vegetables based on whether they should be stored in the refrigerator, on the counter, in the pantry, or a combination.</p> <p>The sheet also includes<strong> 9 tips for safe fruit and vegetable handling</strong>, including:</p> <ol><li>In the grocery cart and at home, keep fruits and vegetables separated from raw meat, poultry, and seafood to prevent cross-contamination.</li> <li>Once at home, store all fresh-cut, ready-to-eat, prepared produce in the refrigerator to keep it cold.</li> <li>Wash all whole fruits and vegetables, including larger items like melons, just before preparation for eating. Cut out damaged (bruised, discolored) areas before eating.</li> <li>Before and after handling fruits and vegetables make sure your work area and utensils are clean and that your hands have been washed with hot soapy water.</li> <li>Fruits and vegetables should be washed under running water. Soaking them in water increases the opportunity for cross-contamination and is not recommended.</li> <li>Produce such as apples, cucumbers and melons that can be rubbed without<br /> damage should be scrubbed using clean hands or a clean scrub brush.</li> <li>Dry washed fruits and vegetables with clean disposable paper towels.</li> <li>Once cut or prepared, all fruits and vegetables should be refrigerated promptly. After serving, refrigerate leftovers within two hours.</li> <li>It is not necessary to wash ready-to-eat, pre-washed and packaged, fresh-cut produce. If you choose to rewash this type of produce, follow the instructions above. Always wash un-packaged, prepared salad mixes under running<br /> water prior to consumption.</li> </ol><p>What do concerns about quality and freshness of fruits and vegetables have to do with Mitcham’s work with the Horticulture Innovation Lab, where she is focused on food security and nutrition in developing countries? Mitcham is trained as a postharvest biologist, so she studies the lifespan of fruits and vegetables after they are harvested. Fruits and vegetables are highly nutritious foods, but also highly perishable and need to be handled with care after harvest so that they do not become damaged. Improving how fruits and vegetables are handled can reduce food waste and postharvest losses — an important way to improve global food security. More on <a href="http://www.fao.org/food-loss-and-food-waste/en/">how reducing food loss and waste can reduce hunger</a>, from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.</p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li><a href="http://ucanr.edu/sites/Postharvest_Technology_Center_/files/230110.pdf">Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables for Better Taste</a> (PDF)</li> <li>GMA article: <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Living/popular-day-grocery-delivery-services/story?id=54268766">Grocery Wars: Trying out 3 popular same-day delivery services</a></li> <li>Yahoo News: <a href="https://www.yahoo.com/gma/trying-3-popular-same-day-grocery-delivery-services-121404252--abc-news-Recipes.html">Trying out 3 popular same-day grocery delivery services</a></li> <li><a href="http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/">UC Postharvest Technology Center</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.fao.org/food-loss-and-food-waste/en/">How reducing food loss and waste improved global food security</a>, from UN Food and Agriculture Organization</li> <li>Information about <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/tag/postharvest-training/">postharvest training activities from the Horticulture Innovation Lab</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/postharvest-practices" hreflang="en">Postharvest practices</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/news" hreflang="en">In the News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/videos-multimedia" hreflang="en">Videos &amp; Multimedia</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/united-states" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 06 Apr 2018 21:35:17 +0000 Brenda Dawson 4191 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Accomplishments from our global network in 2017 https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/accomplishments-2017-global-research-network <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Accomplishments from our global network in 2017</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/tomato-annual-report-header-image-for-blog-2017-03-22-14-35.jpg" width="825" height="449" alt="Wooden crates brimming with tomatoes" title=" Tomatoes packed in tall crates for markets in Burkina Faso, from a market assessment of the tomato value chain. Photo by Guy Kodjogbe." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">February 22, 2018</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3 class="heading--auxiliary">'Annual Report: 2016-2017 Highlights' now available</h3> <p>A new annual report is now available from the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture, with contributions from all of the global network’s research teams. The report highlights accomplishments from October 2016 – October 2017.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="cover of annual report" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4074dd9b-ba87-4aa2-855c-a08eb172be05" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/2017-annual-report-cover-360w-hi.jpg" /><figcaption>Read more about the Horticulture Innovation Lab in <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/media%20page/2017-annual-report.pdf">2016-2017 Annual Report Highlights</a> (PDF).</figcaption></figure><p>While previous annual reports from the Horticulture Innovation Lab have sometimes exceeded 150 pages, we are sharing this year’s report in a condensed format for easier skimming. That said, the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/media%20page/2017-annual-report.pdf">new “Annual Report Highlights”</a> still includes one-page of updates from every one of the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s ongoing research projects.</p> <p>As of the end of the fiscal year in 2017, the Horticulture Innovation Lab has granted all funds for the program’s second phase to develop knowledge on key information gaps across the horticulture value chain. During the past year, promising results have emerged from these research projects. Project teams actively engaged with more than 6,000 farmers, development practitioners, and others who benefited directly from U.S. government assistance.</p> <p>Browse the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/media%20page/2017-annual-report.pdf"><strong>Horticulture Innovation Lab’s 2016-2017 annual report</strong></a>(PDF).</p> <h2><strong>Key accomplishments this year include:</strong></h2> <ul><li><strong>Increasing income:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/nutrition_bangladesh_horticulture.html">Research in Bangladesh</a> shows the profitability of the Horticulture Innovation Lab chimney solar dryer particularly for fish and high-value crops including chili, groundnuts, and mung bean. Farmers also achieved higher profitability and reduced postharvest losses from short-term storage of high-value crops in the CoolBot cool room.</li> <li><strong>Increasing production:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/grafting_lac.html">Research in Honduras</a> demonstrated that grafted tomato plants with pathogen-resistant rootstocks can increase yields by 100 percent, reducing or eliminating the need for soil pesticides.</li> <li><strong>Improving nutrition:</strong> Two new lines of improved amaranth and two new lines of nightshades were entered into the Kenyan national new seed variety testing program. Seed from varieties that are higher in nutrients will be distributed to commercial and smallholder producers.</li> <li><strong>Gender considerations:</strong> Initial <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/gender_honduras.html">analysis in Honduras</a> of a baseline household survey emphasizes the low dietary diversity in western Honduras and issues of food security, particularly within single-female headed households. Women are disadvantaged in terms of ownership of assets and making decisions about credit. Although women in single-headed households show higher control over income-generating activities, they are less likely to consume adequate amounts of fruits and vegetables and are more likely to experience food insecurity.</li> <li><strong>New technology development:</strong> This year’s research included field-testing or scaling of 60 new technologies (excluding seed varieties).</li> <li><strong>Adoption of improved technologies:</strong> 4,000 farmers report using improved technologies and 620 hectares are under new technology.</li> <li><strong>Building in-country capacity:</strong> Our program provided training to build the capacity of 2,397 government, private sector, and civil society individuals and 167 organizations in Africa, Asia and Latin America.</li> <li><strong>Long-term and short-term training:</strong> Our program is training 75 graduate and undergraduate students. Horticulture Innovation Lab researchers also provided short-term training to 6,365 individuals.</li> <li><strong>Investment in young entrepreneurs:</strong> The Horticulture Innovation Lab established a <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/guinea-center.html">new youth-led Horticulture Training and Services Center</a>in Kindia, Guinea. Young entrepreneurs will demonstrate production and postharvest technologies at a government-led agriculture research center.</li> </ul><p>Peruse the rest of the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/media%20page/2017-annual-report.pdf">annual report</a>, including an executive summary, achievements from each research project, success stories, as well as brief background about the program, where we work, and the importance of horticulture for international development.</p> <p><em>The <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/">Horticulture Innovation Lab</a> is led by a team at UC Davis, with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development as part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative called <a href="http://feedthefuture.gov/">Feed the Future</a>. Our global research network advances fruit and vegetable innovations, empowering smallholder farmers to earn more income while better nourishing their communities.</em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/program-news" hreflang="en">Program News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/annual-report" hreflang="en">annual report</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> Thu, 22 Feb 2018 21:08:48 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3156 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu New projects in Africa and Asia to help fruit and vegetable farmers, with a little help from U.S. university students https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/new-trellis-projects-africa-asia-farmers-university-students <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New projects in Africa and Asia to help fruit and vegetable farmers, with a little help from U.S. university students</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/Reil-Photos-7-uhmanoa-uganda-trellis-forBlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="374" alt="Young man takes notes, while older man points to a plant in a field with two women to discuss" title="Brad Reil, as a UH Manoa entomology student (green shirt), and Aggrey Ntakimanye with NaFORRI (white shirt) discuss fruit fly larvae on a fallen mango with farmers in Uganda during a Trellis Fund project in 2017. " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">February 09, 2018</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3 class="heading--auxiliary">15 grants awarded to organizations, matched with 16 new graduate students</h3> <p>The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture has awarded 15 new Trellis Fund grants to organizations in Africa and Asia, matching these new projects to 16 graduate students who will provide agriculture expertise requested by the organizations.</p> <p>The Trellis Fund is a model started by the Horticulture Innovation Lab in 2011 as a way to connect organizations that are well-rooted in their local communities in developing countries with budding agricultural scientists. In addition to helping local farmers, the projects also build the institutional capacity of the organizations and expose graduate students to critical agricultural needs in transitional economies.</p> <p>Selected organizations each receive $4,000 grants for a wide variety of projects that will help smallholder farmers improve how they grow or sell fruit and vegetable crops.</p> <p>Selected graduate students serve as consultants on the horticulture projects during 2018, working remotely and also briefly traveling to the project to better understand local context and provide in-person support. As Trellis Fund fellows, the students participate in a preparatory seminar and are also provided travel funds and a $300 stipend upon project completion.</p> <p>The <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/">Horticulture Innovation Lab</a> is led by a team at the University of California, Davis, with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development, as part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative, <a href="http://feedthefuture.gov/">Feed the Future</a>. Organizations from countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America that are prioritized by Feed the Future were eligible to apply for grant funds. Students from the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/partners.html#partners">partner institutions</a> — including UC Davis, University of Florida, North Carolina State University, and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa — were eligible to apply as fellows.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="student in Florida shirt works with two students from Ghana at a computer screen" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="fb6a233a-0c99-424a-a001-af5dc9a89418" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/uflorida-ghana-trellis-dev-paudel-edits-300dpi-blogheader-smaller.jpg" /><figcaption>From left: As a UF graduate student, Dev Paudel works with Shiraz lbn Haliq and lssahaku Fauzia in Ghana to learn about open-source statistical analysis, during a Trellis Fund project in 2015 led by the Kayaba Management Foundation. <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2016/04/students-help-students-learn-state-of-the-art-science/">Read more about Dev’s experience</a>.</figcaption></figure><h3>Projects supported by University of Florida students and scholars:</h3> <p>Nine UF students and scholars were selected to support eight projects in Ghana, Rwanda and Uganda with the Horticulture Innovation Lab. One project in particular will be supported by two students who also work closely together as business partners and will be securing outside funding for the additional student’s travel costs.</p> <ul><li><strong>Ghana: </strong>The <strong>Kumasi Institute of Tropical Agriculture</strong> has been awarded a Trellis Fund project, to provide farmer trainings on organic agricultural practices for fruit and vegetable production. <strong>Claire Friedrichsen</strong>, a UF student pursuing a Ph.D. in Soil and Water Sciences, will travel to Ghana to support this project.</li> <li><strong>Ghana: </strong>A private company, <strong>Tip Top Foods, Ltd.</strong>, will lead a Trellis Fund project that compares biochar treatments for farming in sandy soils. <strong>Saroop Sandhu</strong>, a Ph.D. student in the UF Soil and Water Sciences Department, will travel and work in Ghana to support this project.</li> <li><strong>Ghana: </strong>The <strong>University of Cape Coast </strong>will lead a Trellis Fund project focused on irrigation and seedling transplanting skills for tomato farmers.<strong> Prosanta Dash</strong>, a UF student pursuing a Ph.D. in Horticultural Sciences will support this project and travel to Ghana to work with farmers.</li> <li><strong>Ghana: Methodist University College Ghana</strong> was awarded a Trellis Fund grant for a project focused on training for value-added processing of mango. As an international scholar at the University of Florida studying food technology, <strong>Sidrah Rafique</strong> was selected to travel to Ghana to support this project.</li> <li><strong>Rwanda: </strong>The <strong>University of Rwanda</strong> will use a Trellis Fund grant to train horticultural farmers in good agricultural practices (GAPs). <strong>Kshitij Khatri</strong>, who is pursuing a Ph.D. in horticultural sciences at UF, will travel to Rwanda to support this project.</li> <li><strong>Rwanda: </strong>An agricultural company,<strong> SYBASH, Ltd.</strong>, has been awarded a Trellis Fund grant to lead trainings in fruit tree planting and production. <strong>Sanju Kunwar</strong>, a Ph.D. student in the UF Plant Pathology department, will travel to Rwanda to work with farmers in support of this project.</li> <li><strong>Uganda: </strong>The organization<strong> Environmental Conservation and Agricultural Enhancement Uganda (Eco-Agric Uganda) </strong>will use a Trellis Fund grant to provide trainings to farmers on small-scale irrigation and postharvest handling of mushrooms and tomatoes. <strong>Krishna Bhattarai</strong>, a UF graduate student pursuing a Ph.D. in Environmental Horticulture, will travel to Uganda to support this project.</li> <li><strong>Uganda: </strong>The<strong> Ndibwami Integrated Rescue Project </strong>will lead a Trellis Fund project that trains farmers in processing pineapple, tomatoes, and passion fruit. This project will be supported by <strong>Raminder Kaur</strong>, who is pursuing a doctoral degree in the UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Also working on this project will be <strong>Ranjeet Singh Randhawa</strong>, who is pursuing a doctoral degree in Horticultural Sciences and a master’s degree in Agribusiness from the UF Food and Resource Economics Department.</li> </ul><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Young woman teaching about pineapples in full classroom with chalkboard and farmers listening." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="aa815528-1793-4f5e-9a18-d4863ea9d52c" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/Measuring-soluble-solids-at-uganda-postharvest-workshop-ucdavis-karin-BlogHeader.jpg" /><figcaption>Karin Albornoz, a UC Davis graduate student, leads a workshop in postharvest handling of pineapple for farmers in Uganda, during a 2017 Trellis Fund project led by Ndibwami Integrated Rescue Project. Ndibwami Integrated Rescue Project has also secured a Trellis Fund grant for 2018, this time focused on fruit processing. <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2018/01/video-uc-davis-student-connects-with-ugandan-farmers-over-pineapple-postharvest-practices/">Watch a 2-minute video</a> about Karin’s recent experience.</figcaption></figure><h3>Five projects supported by UC Davis students:</h3> <p>Five UC Davis graduate students were selected to participate in Trellis Fund projects in Uganda, Ethiopia and Nepal with the Horticulture Innovation Lab. The Trellis Fund program is also managed by UC Davis graduate students who work with the Horticulture Innovation Lab management team.</p> <ul><li><strong>Uganda:</strong> The <strong>Teso Women’s Development Enterprise, Ltd.</strong>, will lead a Trellis Fund project focused on promoting value-addition activities for mangoes and oranges with small-scale fruit farmers. <strong>Claire Adkison</strong>, a UC Davis graduate student in Horticulture and Agronomy, will travel to Uganda to support this project’s trainings on fruit processing.</li> <li><strong>Uganda: </strong>The<strong> Mwino Group </strong>will focus on enhancing shelf-life of fruits and vegetables for off-season supply, during their Trellis Fund project. Traveling to Uganda to support this project will be <strong>Annabelle Yu</strong>, a UC Davis graduate student pursuing a doctoral degree in Microbiology.</li> <li><strong>Uganda: </strong>An organization called <strong>Uganda Rural Information and Communication Technology</strong> (URICT-Uganda) received a Trellis Fund grant to train farmers on pest and disease management for fruit crops. <strong>Karla Huerta</strong>, a graduate student studying Horticulture and Agronomy in the UC Davis Viticulture and Enology Department, will support the project and travel to Uganda to work with farmers.</li> <li><strong>Ethiopia:</strong> An organization called <strong>Send a Cow Ethiopia</strong> will lead a project focused on nutritional benefits of eating sweet potato leaves with its Trellis Fund grant. <strong>Lauren Howe</strong>, a UC Davis student in International Agricultural Development who is also a graduate assistant for the Horticulture Innovation Lab, will travel to Ethiopia to support this project.</li> <li><strong>Nepal: </strong>The <strong>Center for Agricultural Research and Development-Nepal (CARD-Nepal) </strong>has received a Trellis Fund grant for a project focused on training vegetable farmers in soil management practices. <strong>Stewart Wilson</strong>, who is pursuing a doctoral degree in Soils and Biogeochemistry at UC Davis, will travel to Nepal to work with farmers on soil health.</li> </ul><h3>Project supported by NC State student:</h3> <p>One NC State graduate student has been selected to participate in a Trellis Fund project in Nepal, through the Horticulture Innovation Lab:</p> <ul><li><strong>Nepal: </strong>An organization called <strong>Aythos, Inc.</strong>, has been awarded a Trellis Fund grant to provide agribusiness training for kiwi fruit farmers.<strong>Nataraja Venkatesh Maheshala</strong>, an NC State student pursuing a doctoral degree in Entomology, will support this project and travel to Nepal to work with farmers.</li> </ul><h3>Project supported by UH Mānoa student:</h3> <p>A UH graduate student has been selected to participate in a Trellis Fund project in Tanzania, through the Horticulture Innovation Lab:</p> <ul><li><strong>Tanzania:</strong> The<strong> Horticultural Research and Training Institute in Tengeru (HORTI Tengeru) </strong>will lead a Trellis Fund project focused on promoting mulch use in vegetable production. Traveling to Tanzania to support this project will be <strong>Russell Galanti</strong>, a master’s student in the Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences at UH Mānoa.</li> </ul><p> </p> <h3>More information:</h3> <ul><li><a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund on the Horticulture Innovation Lab website</a></li> <li><a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis/2018-trellis-factsheet.pdf">Trellis Fund factsheet with 2018 projects</a> (PDF)</li> <li><strong>Related blog post with video: </strong><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2018/01/video-uc-davis-student-connects-with-ugandan-farmers-over-pineapple-postharvest-practices/">UC Davis student connects with Ugandan farmers over pineapple postharvest practices</a></li> <li><strong>Related blog post:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2016/04/students-help-students-learn-state-of-the-art-science/">UF student helps students in Ghana learn state-of-the-art science</a></li> <li><strong>Related blog post with video:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/06/university-hawaii-student-helps-farmers-soil-tests-in-nepal/">UH Manoa student helps with farmers first soil tests in Nepal</a></li> <li><strong>Related blog post:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/10/sharing-postharvest-knowledge-from-classroom-to-mango-farm/">UC Davis student shares postharvest knowledge, from classroom to mango farm</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/announcement" hreflang="en">Announcement</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/trellis" hreflang="en">Trellis</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students" hreflang="en">students</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/ghana" hreflang="en">Ghana</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/rwanda" hreflang="en">Rwanda</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/uganda" hreflang="en">Uganda</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/tanzania" hreflang="en">Tanzania</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/ethiopia" hreflang="en">Ethiopia</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/nepal" hreflang="en">Nepal</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 09 Feb 2018 21:14:45 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3161 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Video: UC Davis student connects with Ugandan farmers over pineapple postharvest practices https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/video-uc-davis-student-connects-with-ugandan-farmers-pineapple-postharvest <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Video: UC Davis student connects with Ugandan farmers over pineapple postharvest practices</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/Measuring-soluble-solids-at-uganda-postharvest-workshop-ucdavis-karin-BlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="412" alt="Young woman teaching about pineapples in classroom full of farmers." title=" Karin Albornoz leads a workshop in postharvest handling of pineapple in Uganda, with a Trellis Fund project led by NIRP." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">January 26, 2018</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em>A version of this blog post originally appeared on the <a href="http://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=25897">UC ANR Food Blog</a>.</em></p> <p>Sometimes it helps to pause and reconnect with what motivates your work.</p> <p>For <strong>Karin Albornoz</strong> — a Ph.D. student studying Horticulture and Agronomy who works in a <a href="http://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/plantsciences_faculty/beckles/">UC Davis lab</a> on molecular biology of tomato postharvest chilling injury — that means getting out into the world to work directly with small-scale farmers.</p> <p>“I spend so much time in the lab,” she said. “Sometimes I spend a whole day in the lab extracting RNA or writing a paper. This reminds me why I am doing this work: to make a real-world impact.”</p> <p>In December, she returned from a trip to Uganda where she did exactly that. In partnership with a local organization called <strong>Ndibwami Integrated Rescue Project (NIRP)</strong>, Albornoz shared her expertise with farmers through several hands-on workshops about improving harvest practices and postharvest handling of pineapple, passion fruit and tomatoes. The project she worked on was supported by the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Horticulture Innovation Lab</a>, a global research network led by UC Davis with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development, as part of he U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative called  Feed the Future.</p> <p>Though Albornoz has worked with rural farmers before, this was her first time working in Africa.</p> <blockquote> <p>“Everywhere I looked, things were growing. There were people working in the field, women cooking, and everyone was working with food,” she said. “I know there’s a lot of stigma – when you talk about Africa, you see people’s faces change and they’re thinking about things like drought and famine and starving children. But what I saw doesn’t fit that stereotype. The challenges they are facing seem to be about not having access to opportunities.”</p> </blockquote> <p>The workshops she led are part of the NIRP organization’s efforts to connect farmers with more lucrative markets that pay higher prices for quality produce, through a <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund project</a>.</p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 56.25%"><iframe width="480" height="270" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a6sWAgrDq4o?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p><em>In this <a href="https://youtu.be/a6sWAgrDq4o">2-minute video</a>, Karin Albornoz visits a pineapple farm, leads a pineapple training and discusses next steps for this Trellis Fund project led by NIRP in Uganda in 2017. The video clips and photos were taken by Karin while she was working and edited by Hallie Casey for the Horticulture Innovation Lab.</em></p> <hr /><p>For months, Albornoz has been in contact with NIRP and making plans for the farmer workshops. She prepared postharvest handling manuals for each crop — pineapple, passion fruit and tomato — and asked questions to better understand local resources and the farmers’ existing knowledge.</p> <p>During her 2 weeks in Uganda, she visited farmers’ fields and led three full-day workshops. The first workshop for about 50 farmers focused on pineapple — starting with understanding local quality parameters for this fruit, then best practices for harvesting, sanitation, storage and transportation. The second workshop was focused on tomato, with a similar structure, and the third workshop on passion fruit.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Man peers through a small refractometer to see fruit sugars" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a898b1c6-5ba2-40b5-9fe7-e19417f38cae" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/Participants-uganda-postharvest-workshop2-ucdavis-edits2-crop-forWeb-1600w-768x432.jpg" /><figcaption>During the pineapple workshop, farmers had a chance to measure the fruit’s total soluble solids through a refractometer.</figcaption></figure><p>Her favorite moment? The farmers’ first chance to use a refractometer, to measure soluble solids and learn about sugar levels in the fruit. The refractometers were part of a small toolkit the organization will continue to use.</p> <p>“They were excited to handle this device and see, in numbers, how the sugar levels of the fruit changed depending on the stage of maturity,” she said. “Everyone in the room had a chance to try it.”</p> <p>The experience reinforced her commitment to working with farmers and solving agricultural problems.</p> <p>“A major mistake is to think that you are going just to train or teach other people because those people are always going to end up teaching you too,” Albornoz said. “I made a promise to myself years ago, a personal commitment to working with people in vulnerable situations. I have to do this. Working in agriculture can be a very powerful tool to have an impact in the world.”</p> <p>As Karin’s mentor and an Associate Professor in the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences and Agricultural Experiment Station, <strong>Diane Beckles</strong> supported Karin’s work outside of her lab and views such an experience as important to scholarly development.</p> <p>“Something magical happens when we teach and engage in outreach,” Beckles said. “We often deepen our understanding of what we are teaching, and interacting and engaging with others changes us in that process. It alters how we view and think about science in a way that is positive and rewarding, even though it is not easily quantified.”</p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li><a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund webpage</a></li> <li><a href="http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/Commodity_Resources/Fact_Sheets/Datastores/Fruit_English/?uid=50&amp;ds=798">Pineapple recommendations</a> from the UC Postharvest Technology Center</li> <li>Related blog post: <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/10/sharing-postharvest-knowledge-from-classroom-to-mango-farm/">Sharing postharvest knowledge, from classroom to mango farm</a></li> <li>Related blog post: <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/03/5-ways-trellis-fund-grants-generate-impact/">5 ways Trellis Fund grants generate impact</a></li> <li>Related blog post:<a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2016/05/thanks-from-uganda-why-the-trellis-fund-matters/"> Thanks from Uganda: Why the Trellis Fund matters</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/postharvest-practices" hreflang="en">Postharvest practices</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/field" hreflang="en">From the Field</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/videos-multimedia" hreflang="en">Videos &amp; Multimedia</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/trellis" hreflang="en">Trellis</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students" hreflang="en">students</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/uganda" hreflang="en">Uganda</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-crop field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Crop</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/crop/pineapple" hreflang="en">Pineapple</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 26 Jan 2018 21:26:51 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3166 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu UC Davis and Uganda students consider gender in irrigation design https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/uc-davis-and-uganda-students-consider-gender-irrigation-design <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">UC Davis and Uganda students consider gender in irrigation design</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/uganda-irrigation-gender-ucdavis-julia-IMG-20170828-WA0018-edits-forBlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="335" alt="Student leads a discussion group in outdoor classroom" title=" Julia Jordan, UC Davis graduate student, leads a workshop with Busitema University students on gender equity considerations in the design of irrigation systems in Soroti, Uganda. (Photo by Mariah Coley/UC Davis)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">December 01, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Julia Jordan portrait" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5edcd454-51fc-45a6-a2fc-6413360947b6" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/jordan-julia-IMG_4991-edits-crop-600W-214x300_0.jpg" /><figcaption>Julia Jordan, UC Davis graduate student and RIFA fellow</figcaption></figure><p><em>Editor’s note: <strong>Julia Jordan</strong> is one of two UC Davis graduate students (along with Mariah Coley) who have been working on a Horticulture Innovation Lab project in Uganda</em><em> with support from <a href="http://ip.ucdavis.edu/scholars-and-students/RIFA/">Research and Innovation Fellowship for Agriculture (RIFA)</a>. As a RIFA fellow, she worked in Uganda for 5 months alongside the Teso Women’s Development Initiative and Busitema University students in relation to a project focused on <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/irrigation_uganda.html">developing farmer-led irrigation solutions</a>, with leadership from Kate Scow of UC Davis. Julia previously worked as a graduate assistant with the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s management team at UC Davis.</em></p> <p><em>Below is an excerpt of a blog post that Julia wrote about her work on this project, a version of which has also been shared on the <a href="https://agrilinks.org/post/building-capacity-gender-and-irrigation-design-young-engineers-uganda">Agrilinks website</a>.</em></p> <p>Under the shade of a mango tree on a cool Monday morning in Soroti, Uganda, ten Busitema University student interns gathered and looked around apprehensively. They were seated on bright blue plastic chairs outside of the Teso Women’s Development Initiative (TEWDI) office, where they had been meeting for weeks as part of their internships with a research project focused on  <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/irrigation_uganda.html">developing farmer-led irrigation solutions</a>.</p> <p>The group of crop science, agricultural mechanization, and irrigation engineering majors had just been asked to brainstorm and write down the qualities, roles and expectations they associate with women and those they associate with men. Though initially confused by the exercise, the students were soon furiously scribbling their ideas on a colorful array of sticky notes and, shortly after, engaged in a lively discussion about the gender norms and relationships they have witnessed, experienced, or heard about in their own communities.</p> <p>These soon-to-be professionals, many of whom hail from rural farm families and villages in various regions of Uganda, debated pervasive assumptions about men’s superior physical strength, contemplated what it means for a woman to be expected to “submit” to her husband, and described the perceived threat of a woman attaining a higher education level than a man. They reflected on women’s responsibility to collect firewood and water, men’s tendency to manage cattle, and why it may be more common to see women riding bicycles in some regions rather than others. I encouraged the students to also consider how age, ethnicity, disability status, religion, and other social differences may influence these issues.</p> <p>“So,” I asked them, “what does all of this have to do with designing irrigation technology?”</p> <h3>Water management, thinking beyond technology</h3> <p>This project is a partnership between the University of California, Davis, TEWDI, Busitema University, farmer groups, engineers, and government agencies to conduct participatory research and development activities in dry-season horticulture, with a focus on small-scale irrigation and water management.</p> <p>Busitema University students, interns, and project assistants have played a significant role in the participatory development of low-cost, easy-to-use, small-scale irrigation technologies for the six vegetable-growing sites for this project. “Technology” in this context simply means the tools and infrastructure that farmers use to access, distribute, and apply water. The students work directly alongside farmers and other project team members in the fields, putting into practice what they learn in the classroom to design and implement these innovations, such as a zero-energy water wheel pump, a low-cost land leveling tool, and an efficient canal system, all of which can be constructed and maintained with locally available materials.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="water-powered pump for irrigation in Uganda. Student in rivers shows of water wheel to woman farmer and child." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a133098f-7221-4dd6-8d9d-5e6d4bee9147" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/uganda-water-wheel-innovation-farm-IMG_20170804_141805911-edits-crop-768x950.jpg" /><figcaption>Goden Nuwamanya, project assistant from Busitema University, demonstrates his water-powered pump design to farmers at a project site in Tente, Uganda. He recently also demonstrated this pump at a university event, where the <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/10/uganda-president-commends-students-for-irrigation-innovation/">president of Uganda commended the university’s irrigation work with rural farmers</a>. (Photo by Julia Jordan/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p>Rather than concentrate solely on the technical and engineering aspects of irrigation, the interdisciplinary project team also emphasizes the social elements of irrigation development. The project aims to understand and address site-specific issues that enable or constrain farmers’ ability to use and benefit from irrigation, including systems of local governance, gender norms and access to land, water, labor, and time.</p> <p>The meaningful engagement of women and men farmers in the participatory design, planning, training and implementation of irrigation systems has remained is a priority, encouraging shared decision-making, group cooperation, and equitable access to irrigation resources and benefits.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://ip.ucdavis.edu/profiles/RIFA/julia"><em>Read the rest of Julia’s story from Uganda on the RIFA website.</em></a></strong></p> <h3>More information:</h3> <ul><li>Project information: <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/irrigation_uganda.html">Developing farmer-led irrigation solutions in Uganda</a></li> <li>Related blog post: <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/10/uganda-president-commends-students-for-irrigation-innovation/">Ugandan president commends students for irrigation innovation</a></li> <li>Related blog post:  <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/01/video-irrigation-solutions-uganda-farmer-led-innovation/">Irrigation solutions in Uganda require social science and farmer-led innovation</a></li> <li>More about <a href="http://tewdi.org/">Teso Women’s Development Initiative (TEWDI)</a></li> <li>More about the <a href="http://ip.ucdavis.edu/scholars-and-students/RIFA/">RIFA fellowship program</a></li> <li>More about the <a href="http://gcfsi.isp.msu.edu/grant-projects/building-capacity-assessing-and-deploying-irrigation-innovations/">Global Center for Food Systems Innovation</a></li> </ul><p><em>This project is supported by the Horticulture Innovation Lab (based at UC Davis) and the</em> <em>Global Center for Food Systems Innovation (based at Michigan State University) with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development, as part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative called Feed the Future.</em></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/soil-and-irrigation" hreflang="en">Soil and irrigation</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/gender-considerations" hreflang="en">Gender considerations</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/field" hreflang="en">From the Field</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students" hreflang="en">students</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/uganda" hreflang="en">Uganda</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 01 Dec 2017 20:45:24 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3191 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Young entrepreneurs help Guinea’s farmers access postharvest innovation https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/young-entrepreneurs-help-guineas-farmers-access-postharvest-innovation <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Young entrepreneurs help Guinea’s farmers access postharvest innovation</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/guinea-pineapple-solar-dryer-IMG_1431-edits-crop-forBlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="390" alt="Dried slices of pineapple on wire grid" title="Slices of pineapple dry in a solar chimney dryer. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Brenda Dawson/UC Davis)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">November 15, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em>A version of this article originally appeared as part of the <a href="https://feedthefuture.gov/article/guineas-innovators-plant-seeds-success">Feed the Future newsletter</a>. </em></p> <p>Golden rings of pineapple have already started to dry around the edges, fragrant as they soak up the sun’s heat beneath a sheen of clear plastic — on the way to becoming dried fruit.</p> <p>Fatoumata Cissoko knows this routine of drying pineapple slices well. At 29, she runs a small dried fruit business in West Africa and has already spent three years trying out different drying methods on her parents’ farm in Guinea. She is confident of the entrepreneurial opportunities that are found after harvest — when excess fruit can be processed, dried, stored and sold later at favorable market prices — and she is working to expand her knowledge and share it with more farmers.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="young woman digging with wheelbarrow" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d4f2ee95-76a3-4493-873a-244a9e60ede8" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/Fatoumata-Cissoko-guinea-avenir-eds-crop2-forBlogheader.jpg" /><figcaption>Fatoumata Cissoko works to prepare compost for a demonstration garden at the new horticulture training and services center on the IRAG campus in the Kindia district of Guinea. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Andra Williams/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p>“The best thing about agriculture is being able to harvest the fruit of your work,” Cissoko said. “Farmers are happy when I bring them new things, like the possibility of drying their fruits and vegetables that they cannot sell. And that is a great satisfaction for me.”</p> <p>She is part of a small team that has started a new horticultural training and services center as a way to boost rural entrepreneurship and agricultural prosperity. This effort is part of the <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/guinea/">long recovery from the Ebola outbreak</a>. The burgeoning center is housed on a campus of Guinea’s national agricultural research institute, <em>Institut de Recherche Agronomique de Guinée. </em>For this new center, the research institute is partnering with the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/">Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture</a>, led by researchers at the University of California, Davis.</p> <p>Cissoko is one of four young entrepreneurs who are working to turn the center into a hub for rural innovation and have been trained to extend rural innovation in Guinea with organizations such as <a href="https://www.winrock.org/project/guinea-smarte/">Winrock International</a>and <a href="https://www.cnfa.org/program/feed-the-future-guinea-strengthening-agriculture-value-chains-and-youth/">Cultivating New Frontiers in Agriculture</a> (CNFA).</p> <h2>Promoting new tools to rural farming communities</h2> <p>Together with her colleagues, Cissoko is helping to build a center that will reflect the needs of the rural farming community in the Kindia district and surrounding region. Eventually, the center will offer training to farmers and demonstrate how new technologies work.</p> <p>To efficiently dry pineapple slices — as well as other fruits and vegetables — the team has built a <a href="/chimney-solar-dryer">chimney solar dryer</a> from wood and plastic tarps, designed by UC Davis researchers.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="group looking at chimney solar dryer, with sliced fruit visible through clear plastic" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="7d1b6c1c-1711-43b4-a316-0f8bd59766a7" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/guinea-solar-dryer-fruit-DSC00161-crop-sized.jpg" /><figcaption>Pineapples and other fruit drying in the chimney solar dryer at the new demonstration center, built with help from Cissoko. Here a group from the U.S. Embassy in Guinea visits, including Mamy Keita (USAID/Guinea), Barbara Dickerson (USAID/Guinea) Andra Williams (Horticulture Innovation Lab), and Aboubacar Camara (director of the research center, with IRAG).</figcaption></figure><p>To test whether the food is dry enough to store safely without mold growth, the team is manufacturing a new dryness indicator called the DryCard™. The <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/drycard.html">DryCard</a> is a low-cost tool, the size of a business card, that indicates levels of moisture by changing color. It’s convenient for farmers, who can seal a reusable DryCard and a sample of their dried product in an airtight container to test the humidity within.</p> <p>The team is also demonstrating other horticultural technologies, including drip irrigation and plastic mulch. These are all tools that were identified by Horticulture Innovation Lab researchers as significant <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/guinea/">ways to help support Guinea’s horticulture sector</a>.</p> <p>The researchers at the center will identify which tools and agricultural services are marketable in the region, with sensitivity to the needs of French-speaking Africa. By bolstering young entrepreneurs like Cissoko with business training and access to these new innovations, the center is not only advancing rural farmers, but also enabling successful youth entry into agriculture. Supporting the advancement of this new generation is critical during a time when unemployment is growing across Africa, particularly among youth.</p> <p>“We’re providing necessary tools to help the farming community recover, while also bolstering and enriching young entrepreneurs,” said <a href="/people/erin-mcguire">Erin McGuire</a>, associate director of the Horticulture Innovation Lab, at UC Davis. “As the center grows, we see it helping create the next generation of agriculture leaders.”</p> <p><em>The Horticulture Innovation Lab is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development and led by UC Davis, as part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative called Feed the Future. Find out more about the new center and the horticulture sector in Guinea on the <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/guinea-center.html">Horticulture Innovation Lab’s website</a>.</em></p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li>Project information: <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/guinea-center.html">Establishing a horticulture center in Guinea</a></li> <li>Related blog post: <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/09/opening-a-center-for-horticulture-innovations-in-guinea/">Opening a center for horticulture innovations in Guinea</a></li> <li>Related blog post: <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2015/12/report-on-horticulture-in-guinea-after-ebola/">New report on horticulture in Guinea, after Ebola</a></li> <li>Horticulture value chain report and background: <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/guinea/">Rapid Assessment of the Horticulture Sector in Guinea</a></li> <li>More about the <a href="https://www.cnfa.org/program/feed-the-future-guinea-strengthening-agriculture-value-chains-and-youth/">AVENIRs project with CNFA and Winrock</a></li> <li>More from USAID/Guinea about <a href="https://www.usaid.gov/guinea/environment">Feed the Future Guinea Agricultural Services</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/postharvest-practices" hreflang="en">Postharvest practices</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/success-story" hreflang="en">Success Story</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/success-story" hreflang="en">success story</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/guinea" hreflang="en">Guinea</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-technology field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Technology</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chimney-solar-dryer" hreflang="en">Chimney solar dryer</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-crop field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Crop</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/crop/pineapple" hreflang="en">Pineapple</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 15 Nov 2017 20:55:00 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3196 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Drying beads help Bangladesh farmers access better seed https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/drying-beads-help-bangladesh-farmers-access-better-seed <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Drying beads help Bangladesh farmers access better seed</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/drying-beads-bangladesh-seed-IMG_9085-edits-crop2-forBlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="474" alt="Trainer demonstrates drying beads in front of seed farmer group and company in Bangladesh" title="Korshed A. Chowdhury leads a training on using drying beads to process seed with a group of farmers, seed company employees and agricultural workers in May 2017. " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">November 01, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In humid Bangladesh, finding reliable vegetable seed can be a challenge — a situation that can ruin a crop before a farmer’s hard work even begins. But Bangladesh seed companies are rapidly adopting a new technology that can improve seed germination and plant vigor, through improved seed processing and storage. Called “drying beads,” this reusable tool can help seed companies provide farmers with higher quality seed, improving the local seed industry and helping farmers maximize the potential of their own hard work.</p> <p>Many of the country’s leading vegetable seed companies have adopted drying beads through a multi-part training led by Rhino Research and supported by the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/scaling_drying_beads.html">Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture</a>, based at the University of California, Davis. Participating organizations include Lal Teer Seed Limited, Metal Seed, Getco, A. R. Malik &amp; Co., Ispahani Agro Limited, Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation and others.</p> <p>“We concluded that these beads are drying our seeds faster and deeper, obtaining a better quality that results in a longer storage potential, and all this with lesser costs,” said Tabith M. Awal of Lal Teer Seed Limited in Bangladesh. “Therefore Lal Teer made the executive decision to move ahead with implementing these beads for all our seeds and crops as soon as possible.”</p> <blockquote> <p>This year, more than 200 tons of vegetable seed have been dried and stored with drying beads — helping an estimated 100,000 farmers in Bangladesh access quality seed.</p> </blockquote> <p>The in-depth training, offered for a week at a time and repeated 3-7 times over several months, has focused on 14 seed leaders in Bangladesh. They have trained more than 70 employees, who in turn have trained more than 500 seed production farmers in how to use drying beads and maintain seed quality.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Bangladeshi farmers sort vegetable seed" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a86fe5fd-2a3f-4a40-9586-bad471233e74" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/drying-seed-bangladesh-industry-DSC_0078-768x432.jpg" /><figcaption>Workers processing vegetable seed at a seed company in Bangladesh.</figcaption></figure><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="drying bead boxes with seed" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="bf4fdf1a-182b-4ce6-adba-e09af0cbbb9a" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/drying-beads-seed-containers-8895884926_d0905d29a5_o-768x512.jpg" /><figcaption>Drying vegetable seed with drying beads in airtight containers.</figcaption></figure><h2>How reusable drying beads work in Bangladeshi seed systems</h2> <p>In a sealed container, the zeolite-based drying beads can dry seeds to very low moisture contents — preventing mold growth, restricting insect habitation, and preserving seed quality. The beads can be regenerated in an oven for repeated use.</p> <p>Seed farmers in Bangladesh first dry their seed in the sun — and that’s where many of them stop (a survey showed about 22% also used fan drying and 8% used heated air). Companies that have adopted drying beads use them in containers to transport the seed from the farmer to company storage, where they can collect the fully dried seeds and return a container with fresh drying beads to the field.</p> <p>Horticulture Innovation Lab researchers have <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/32_drying_beads_seeds.html">previously</a> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/4Seeds.html">shown</a> drying beads are effective for seed storage, and developed an overarching <a href="/Information-product/poster/dry-chain-maintain-seed-quality-humid-regions">“dry chain” concept</a>. “Make it dry, keep it dry” is the motto of the dry chain, which specifies how to maintain quality and safety of dried products — not just seed.</p> <p>“What is really remarkable is the explosion of different ideas in how to use the drying beads,” said Johan Van Asbrouck of Rhino Research. “But we are starting with seeds, maximizing the potential of the crop at a farmer’s level. If you don’t have quality seed, you start penalized and will not have the crop you could.”</p> <p><em>Photo at top: Korshed A. Chowdhury leads a training on using drying beads to process seed with a group of farmers, seed company employees and agricultural workers in May 2017. </em></p> <p><em>This article is also available as a one-page <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/media%20page/success_scaling_drying_beads.pdf">success story fact sheet</a> (PDF).</em></p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li><strong>Project information:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/scaling_drying_beads.html">Scaling up drying technologies for seed in Bangladesh</a></li> <li><strong>Technology fact sheet: </strong><a href="/Information-product/fact-sheet-program-materials/drying-beads-save-high-quality-seeds">Drying beads save high quality seeds</a></li> <li><strong>Related blog post with video:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2015/03/drying-beads-in-scidevnet-video/">How drying beads work, in a new SciDev.Net video</a></li> <li><strong>Related blog post:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2015/02/dry-chain-partnership-helps-farmers-store-seed-better/">‘Dry chain’ partnership helps farmers store seed better</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.dryingbeads.org/">Drying beads website</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/seed-systems-and-germplasm" hreflang="en">Seed systems and germplasm</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/postharvest-practices" hreflang="en">Postharvest practices</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/training-and-extension" hreflang="en">Training and extension</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/success-story" hreflang="en">Success Story</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/success-story" hreflang="en">success story</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/bangladesh" hreflang="en">Bangladesh</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-technology field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Technology</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/drying-beads" hreflang="en">Drying beads</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 01 Nov 2017 20:03:16 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3201 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Ugandan president commends students for irrigation innovations https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/ugandan-president-commends-students-irrigation-innovations <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Ugandan president commends students for irrigation innovations</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/Busitema-irrigation-Spiral-Pump-Fabrication-edits-blogHeader-825x510.jpg" width="825" height="510" alt="students with metal water wheel in workshop" title="Busitema University students Goden Nawamanya (right) with Cylus Tumushabe (left) work on fabricating a prototype water-powered “hydro wheel” to help vegetable farmers in Uganda better access irrigation water. (Photo by Abraham Salomon/UC Davis)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 19, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In Uganda, President Yoweri Museveni attended a graduation ceremony this month at <a href="http://busitema.ac.ug/">Busitema University, </a>lauding the institution and its students for their work with irrigation innovations.</p> <p>Students and faculty members at Busitema University are part of a Horticulture Innovation Lab project focused on <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/irrigation_uganda.html">developing farmer-led irrigation solutions</a>. The project is led by Kate Scow of UC Davis, with additional partners from the Teso Women Development Initiative, the National Semi Arid Resources Research Institute and others.</p> <p>“I want to encourage you. You’re on the right path, and I will give you all my support,” Museveni can be heard saying in the video from <a href="http://www.ntv.co.ug/">NTV Uganda</a>, below. “A university is the place for innovations and knowledge generation. It is also a place where the future of our youth is forged through education and where our people’s lives are changed through community outreach.”</p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 56.25%"><iframe width="480" height="270" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BYB9VEGWkpY?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>Among the irrigation prototypes featured at the ceremony (and in the video) was a self-propelled “hydro wheel,” which is designed to pump water from a stream to farmers’ plots. The hydro wheel was designed by one of the day’s graduates: Goden Nawamanya, who earned a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Mechanization and Irrigation Engineering. The hydro wheel is currently being tested at the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s demonstration site in Tente, Busia.</p> <p>“This is going to help the farmers so that they don’t have to rely on rainfall to irrigate their crops,” explains Marion Engole, lecturer at Busitema University in the department of Water Resources and Mining Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering.</p> <p>Catherine Wandera of Busitema University has coordinated the team’s activities with the university and gathered an active team of students to participate in the project as research assistants and interns. The Horticulture Innovation Lab project has included students studying irrigation engineering and agronomy.</p> <p>Also graduating that day was Andrew Ebic, who worked as a research assistant on this project and earned a master’s of science degree in Irrigation and Drainage Engineering. His research with the project focused on land suitability assessment for surface irrigation in the Tororo district.</p> <p>“I am beyond proud to see these students show off their innovations and their efforts helping farmers. It is wonderful that they have been working so closely with these rural communities—even the president himself is remarking on it,” said Scow, back at UC Davis.</p> <p>The project involves using a participatory research approach to help farmers in Eastern Uganda identify, adapt and implement small-scale irrigation technologies for vegetable production. This project is supported by the Horticulture Innovation Lab with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development, as part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative called Feed the Future.</p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li><strong>Project webpage:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/irrigation_uganda.html">Developing farmer-led irrigation solutions in Uganda</a></li> <li><strong>Blog:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/01/video-irrigation-solutions-uganda-farmer-led-innovation/">Irrigation solutions in Uganda require social science and farmer-led innovation</a></li> <li><strong>Video:</strong> <a href="/Information-product/presentation-video-2016-annual-meeting/irrigation-innovations-uganda">5-minute intro to this project, as presented by Kate Scow</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.feedthefuture.gov/country/uganda">Feed the Future programming in Uganda</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/soil-and-irrigation" hreflang="en">Soil and irrigation</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/news" hreflang="en">In the News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/videos-multimedia" hreflang="en">Videos &amp; Multimedia</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/uganda" hreflang="en">Uganda</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 19 Oct 2017 20:12:05 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3211 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Sharing postharvest knowledge, from classroom to mango farm https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/sharing-postharvest-knowledge-classroom-mango-farm <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Sharing postharvest knowledge, from classroom to mango farm</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/nick-reitz-solar-dryer-ucdavis-IMG_7234-edits-forBlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="497" alt="Young men arranging clear plastic over solar dryer with fruit drying inside" title="Before leaving for Ghana, Nick Reitz practiced drying mango in a chimney solar dryer on the UC Davis campus, shown here with Archie Jarman from the Horticulture Innovation Lab. " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 03, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Nick Reitz portrait" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5fb3d8a0-340d-4ce8-ac3f-ff5aa12917ce" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/Reitz-Nicholas-pic-from-Food-Sci-Tech-dept-crop-200wforWeb-214x300.jpg" /><figcaption>Nick Reitz, UC Davis graduate student who participated in Trellis Fund project in Ghana</figcaption></figure><p><em>Editor’s note: <strong>Nick Reitz</strong> is a doctoral student in the UC Davis Department of Food Science and Technology, who participated in a <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund</a> project led by the Methodist University College Ghana. Here Nick shares some details about his trip to Ghana for this project, which focused on food processing for mango farmers. Though Nick did not have previous experience with mangoes, he had a lot of knowledge to share about postharvest practices. <strong>Updated Nov. 6:</strong> The Horticulture Innovation Lab has extended the deadline for <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">graduate students to apply</a> for 5 new Trellis Fund projects focused on postharvest handling, small-scale processing and food preservation in Africa.</em></p> <p><strong>Question: How does your work on this Trellis Fund project fit into your studies and career, as a Food Science grad student?</strong></p> <p><strong>Nick Reitz:</strong> Prior to this project, I knew almost nothing about mangos. However, my background knowledge of postharvest biology and food processing technology mixed with a fair amount of research helped overcome this lack of knowledge. The basic science behind food preservation is the same regardless of what technology is available. If you know the basics, you can find a method and predict what will happen. Adapting my knowledge to the conditions and resources available in Ghana has been one of the most interesting parts of this project so far.</p> <p>While I enjoy traveling, learning about other cultures, and learning new languages, this is my first time working in international agricultural development. Help from the Trellis Fund team, Beth Mitcham, and the Horticulture Innovation Lab allowed me to build up the knowledge and resources needed to make the trip and project a success so far.</p> <p>On a side note, this project has shown me how much I take for granted the staggering amount of resources available to UC Davis students through the library and scientific subscription system. At MUCG, they do not have subscriptions to scientific journals and thus rely mostly on open access journals or textbooks. This makes keeping up to date or doing background research very difficult.</p> <p><strong>Have you traveled to Ghana or elsewhere in Africa before?</strong></p> <p>This was my first trip to Africa and only my second time out of North America. I was pleasantly surprised at how kind and welcoming the people of Ghana were, particularly in the Wenchi Region. Everyone greeted me with a smile, and my attempts at even the most rudimentary Twi phrases were met with excitement and attempts at conversation.</p> <p>One interesting thing I learned: In the local culture, it matters quite a lot what day of the week you were born. Sunday? Well lucky you, you get to be closer to god. The farmers at the workshop asked during an otherwise serious question and answer session what day I was born on. I had no idea. They were amazed, appalled, perhaps even a bit angry. “He doesn’t know what day he was born on? He is only 25, he should remember.” Anyway, I looked it up: Thursday. They laughed and said I was YAWO. I have no idea what this means. Perhaps I am not so close to god.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="student and farmers in front of mango tree" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="1c6ed8a0-1452-46fb-a988-3423ad9a70bf" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/ghana-farmers-mango-trellis-ucdavis-student-CIMG3831-768x512.jpg" /><figcaption>Nick Reitz of UC Davis, second from left, visits with mango farmers in Ghana before leading workshops on postharvest handling.</figcaption></figure><p><strong>Tell us about the work you did in Ghana for this Trellis Fund project.</strong></p> <p>The first two days were spent on tours of two Methodist University College Ghana campuses — MUCG Accra and MUCG Wenchi — and tours of the Wenchi facilities, research plots, and processing centers. During this time, I was accompanied by the project coordinator Mr. Daniel Owusu Kyeremateng, who was a constant source of support prior to and throughout the trip. I was also able to meet college leadership, including the Dean of Applied Sciences, Prof. G. W. K. Mensah; Department Head of Agriculture and Agribusiness, Mr. Joseph Nketiah; and Prof. Emmanuel Marfo. I also met with executives from the Wenchi Mango and Citrus Association for an in-depth discussion on the purpose of the project and the workshops, as well as each party’s role in making them a success.</p> <p>Next, the Mango Association executives and Mr. Nketiah accompanied me on several farm visits. Farmers were welcoming and excited to show us around the farm. They were interested to hear what I thought of their farms and if they could improve. Coming from the processing and postharvest side of things, I was unable in many cases to make suggestions for their orchards, but Mr. Nketiah was very helpful and used some of this time for extension suggestions on Bacterial Black Spot and pruning of mango trees. These farm visits helped boost interest for the coming workshops and gave me a first-hand look at the common practices and conditions on the farms.</p> <p>Then we held three workshops to train around 100 mango farmers and sellers in harvest maturity, harvest practices, and postharvest handling. About two-thirds of the participants did not speak English, so the workshops were introduced and interpreted by either Mr. NKetiah or Mr. Kyeremateng. Workshops included presentations, demonstrations, and lengthy discussions which often led to additional, unscheduled demonstrations.</p> <p>During the second week, I led a seminar on small-scale processing at the university, for about 25 students, some faculty members, Mr. Nketiah, and the college dean. The main theme of the presentation was “Hurdle Technology,” which in food science is the practice creating multiple obstacles (such as salt, low pH, heating, drying) to slow or stop the growth of spoilage microbes.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="researchers with large solar dryer covered in clear plastic" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="29bb59d0-8ef3-48fa-acd1-3ebd52a40871" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/ghana-solar-dryer-mango-farmers-0523171539-01-edits-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>While in Ghana, Nick Reitz worked with students, faculty and staff at Methodist University College Ghana to build a sample chimney solar dryer to use with mangoes.</figcaption></figure><p>Throughout my visit, the project team and I planned and built a chimney solar dryer over two days at the MUCG Wenchi campus. We bought supplies from local markets and local carpenters very skillfully constructed the dryer from our plans. Attending the construction process were the Dean Mensah, Prof. Marfo, Mr. Nketiah, Mr. Kyeremateng, a processing staff member, myself, and about 7 students.</p> <p><strong>What was your favorite moment on this trip?</strong></p> <p>The level of interest expressed by the farmers made the workshops extremely enjoyable and worthwhile. They had a genuine interest in incorporating the material into their harvest routines.</p> <p>At the beginning of each workshop, I made it clear that I too was here to learn from them. They took this seriously, and we had very good conversations about fruit maturity indicators they used and very serious problems on their farms.</p> <p>At one point 35 farmers, Mr. Nketiah, and I ventured out of the classroom to a nearby stand of mango trees and spent a half hour discussing what they saw on their farms. Directly working with mango farmers produced a number of memorable moments like this.</p> <p><strong>What would you say to other students who might be considering participating in a Trellis project?</strong></p> <p>Working on a Trellis Fund project will take time, personal effort, and sacrifice. If you choose not to participate, you will almost certainly complete more research and get better grades in courses. However, if you give this project your all and make the most of the opportunity, you will come out with immeasurable experience and perspective you will keep for the rest of your career.</p> <p>This project has shown me that working in international development can help fulfill my desire to help others with my career. I hope to continue working in development in the future, in addition to working in academic research, teaching, and/or extension. This has been a good first step in including international development work in my career plan.</p> <p><em><strong>Editor’s note, updated Nov. 6: </strong>The Horticulture Innovation Lab has extended the deadline for <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">graduate students to apply</a> to participate in 5 Trellis Fund projects in Uganda and Ghana, specifically focused on postharvest handling, small-scale processing and food preservation. Students from UC Davis, North Carolina State University, the University of Florida, and the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa are eligible to apply by <strong>Nov. 20, 2017</strong> <s>Oct. 27, 2017</s>. Please visit the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund webpage</a> for more details and share this information with students who might be interested.</em></p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/09/inspiring-students-to-help-farmers-in-developing-countries-apply-now/">Inspiring students to help farmers in developing countries (Apply now!)</a></li> <li><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/06/university-hawaii-student-helps-farmers-soil-tests-in-nepal/">UH Manoa student helps with farmers’ first soil tests in Nepal</a></li> <li><a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund webpage</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/postharvest-practices" hreflang="en">Postharvest practices</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/qa-interview" hreflang="en">Q&amp;A Interview</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/trellis" hreflang="en">Trellis</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students" hreflang="en">students</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/ghana" hreflang="en">Ghana</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-technology field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Technology</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chimney-solar-dryer" hreflang="en">Chimney solar dryer</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-crop field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Crop</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/crop/mango" hreflang="en">Mango</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:21:10 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3216 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Opening a center for horticulture innovations in Guinea https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/opening-center-horticulture-innovations-guinea <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Opening a center for horticulture innovations in Guinea</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/guinea-irag-usaid-pineapple-DSC00157-forBlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="362" alt="Group visits pineapple plot at demonstration center in Guinea" title="Andra Williams (center) talks with Hugues Ogier, deputy chief of mission for the U.S. Embassy in Guinea, and other visitors about using plastic mulch for growing pineapple." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 27, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Andra Williams portrait" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="f72f48a2-f860-4c62-987b-2d47f7dc0477" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/williams-andra-mugIMG_5834-edits-crop-214x300.jpg" /><figcaption>Andra Williams, Horticulture Innovation Lab</figcaption></figure><p><em>Editor’s note: <strong>Andra Williams</strong> recently completed work in Guinea as a UC Davis staff member with the Horticulture Innovation Lab (see details at the end of this post about our new team member in Guinea). In the wake of Ebola, the Horticulture Innovation Lab was asked to evaluate fruit and vegetable opportunities for West African farmers in Guinea. The resulting “<a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/guinea/">Rapid Assessment of the Horticulture Sector in Guinea” report</a> made several recommendations for ways to provide support to the country’s farmers — and the Horticulture Innovation Lab team was invited to share some of its existing horticultural knowledge by starting a new center in the district of Kindia. Here, Andra shares her experiences and accomplishments from working in Guinea.</em></p> <p>Agriculture in Guinea has faced many challenges in recent years, with political instability and health crises, such as the recent Ebola outbreak, limiting agricultural research and farmer training.</p> <p>In April I was sent to work in Foulayah, Guinea, as a project manager for the Horticulture Innovation Lab, tasked with establishing a farmer service and training center in the Kindia district, at the <em>Centre Régional de Recherche Agricole de Foulayah</em> (CRRAF), part of the government’s national agricultural research institute (<em>Institut de Recherche Agronomique de Guinée</em> or IRAG). Our goal was to create a local training center devoted to introducing farmers nearby to horticultural production tools and postharvest technologies by creating training modules for the community, including individual producers, women groups and farming cooperatives.</p> <p>To get started, I hired four “AVENIR agents” to work with the Horticulture Innovation Lab and help establish this new center. AVENIR stands for <em>Agents en Vulgarisation, Entrepreneuriat et Innovation Rurale,</em>or “agents of extension, entrepreneurship and rural innovation.” The AVENIRs are part of a USAID-funded program that is a collaboration between Winrock International and Cultivating New Frontiers in Agriculture (CNFA) to train young, motivated individuals in entrepreneurial, business and marketing skills in the agricultural sector.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="smiling group" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3c3a22e4-6360-4d0d-b5f2-d5836eb6aaa1" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/guinea-avenirs-usaid-DSC00178-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>Horticulture Innovation Lab AVENIRs with the director of the USAID Mission in Guinea, center. From left: Fatoumata Cissoko, Kadiatou Sidibe, Barbara Dickerson, Mamadou Kann and Paul Lamah. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Andra Williams/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p>With the help of our four AVENIR agents — <strong>Fatoumata Cissoko</strong>, <strong>Mamadou Kann</strong>, <strong>Paul Lamah</strong> and <strong>Kadiatou Sidibé</strong> — we began working to set up a training center that will focus on postharvest and horticultural technologies that have already been proven useful by other Horticulture Innovation Lab projects. The AVENIRs have experience in agronomy, soil science, accounting, small business management and social science. They will need to use all of these skills to engage with the community as extension agents for our new center. Our agents will work with us to learn about these technologies and then help train and market these technologies to the surrounding Kindia community.</p> <p>We have already made quite a bit of progress, setting up a demonstration garden area and two greenhouse nurseries. First, we identified a small plot of land on the CRRAF campus to plant eight varieties of fruits and vegetables: eggplant, okra, peppers, carrots, lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes and watermelon, all of which have value as market crops. By creating our own garden space, we can use it to demonstrate technologies like drip irrigation and plastic mulch. Once harvested, we can use the fruits and vegetables to demonstrate postharvest technologies such as the CoolBot and chimney solar dryer.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="wheelbarrow in front of recently ploughed field, on school campus" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="128acabf-9858-4f65-a587-63e527c8d665" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/guinea-training-garden-location-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>Here is the demonstration garden site at CRRAF, after we cleared and leveled it, but before planting.</figcaption></figure><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="young man kneeling on grain bag, weeding by hand" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="937ad23f-0fa2-4800-bd62-fd4dbfe85c4e" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/guinea-avenir-mamadou-Kann-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>Mamadou Kann, an AVENIR, prepares compost for the new demonstration garden. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Andra Williams/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p>We built our first chimney solar dryer, with the help of <strong>Angelos Deltsidis</strong>, Horticulture Innovation Lab postharvest specialist. The <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/tag/chimney-solar-dryer/">chimney solar dryer</a> was designed by UC Davis researchers to dry fruits and vegetables more efficiently than traditional solar dryers, for farmers to use in developing countries.</p> <p>Angelos also helped us install a <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/tag/coolbot/">CoolBot</a> and air conditioner in an out-of-use cold storage room at CRRAF, to demonstrate this low-cost cold room with our garden’s produce.</p> <p>In the future, other technologies and practices related to reducing postharvest losses and maintaining food quality (such as the <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/drycard.html">DryCard</a>) will also be incorporated into the team’s work.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Researcher helps build wooden solar dryer frame" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3e934c11-86de-4360-b4ec-81f12d112e7f" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/guinea-solar-dryer-ucdavis-IMG_1091-e1502836328919-768x1024.jpg" /><figcaption>Angelos Deltsidis works with AVENIR agents to build a chimney solar dryer on the CRRAF campus. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Andra Williams/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p>In addition, we planted a small pineapple plot which we covered in plastic, a practice that we hope local pineapple growers will adopt. The plastic ground cover helps pineapple farmers by reducing labor needed for weed control, while also maintaining soil humidity and temperature. While plastic cover has already been adopted in many West African countries where pineapple production is prevalent, like Togo and Benin, Guinea has yet to see a significant portion of pineapple growers adopt this practice. We would like to demonstrate that they can save time and money using this one simple technology, allowing for greater net profits in the end.</p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="group working on planting pineapple tops through plastic groundcover" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ecd5d5f2-5e35-4698-b828-5c07f2ae5c45" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/guinea-pineapple-plastic-avenir-DSC00141-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>AVENIR agents, center workers and Gabriel Wyland work on planting pineapples and installing plastic mulch on the CRRAF campus. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Andra Williams/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p>The team will also begin working with other technologies in the future such as drip irrigation, to share with local farmers. Educating growers on the importance of soil health and composting for increased organic matter will also be a focus.</p> <p>The center will be used to train farmers, farmer groups, cooperatives, women’s groups and businesses in the area on these horticultural technologies, while the AVENIR agents gain hands-on experience as extension workers. The Horticulture Innovation Lab and the USAID Mission in Guinea are discussing potential options for further supporting this new training center. The team hopes to create a place where those involved in the agricultural sector can come and receive training on how to use improved technologies that can reduce waste, boost production and increase income.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="group looking at chimney solar dryer, with sliced fruit visible through clear plastic" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5507e809-c4d8-4c61-adf9-4ff383d8f3f1" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/guinea-solar-dryer-fruit-DSC00161-crop-sized_0.jpg" /><figcaption>In July, a group from the U.S. Embassy in Guinea visited the new demonstration center and explored its pineapple plot, the CoolBot, and the new chimney solar dryer. From left, Mamy Keita (USAID/Guinea) discusses how to use the chimney solar dryer with Barbara Dickerson (USAID/Guinea) Andra Williams (Horticulture Innovation Lab), and Aboubacar Camara (CRRAF director).</figcaption></figure><p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Gabe Wyland portrait" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="008a000f-8c76-4ae0-a525-60e9e3cbe4d6" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/wyland-gabriel-cropforWeb-eds2.jpg" /><figcaption>Gabriel Wyland, Horticulture Innovation Lab in Guinea</figcaption></figure><p><em>Editor’s note: Joining the Horticulture Innovation Lab team and taking over where Andra left off is <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/team.html#guinea"><strong>Gabriel Wyland</strong></a>, now serving as program representative in Guinea. He holds bachelor’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and first worked in agriculture on a hops farm in Wisconsin. Previous to joining the Horticulture Innovation Lab team, he served in the Peace Corps in Guinea and in Mali.</em></p> <p> </p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li><strong>More about this project: </strong><a href="/project/guinea-center">Establishing a horticulture center in Guinea</a></li> <li><strong>Report:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/guinea/">Rapid Assessment of the Horticulture Sector in Guinea</a></li> <li><strong>Blog</strong>: <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2015/12/report-on-horticulture-in-guinea-after-ebola/">New report on horticulture in Guinea, after Ebola</a></li> <li><strong>Article about U.S. Embassy visit to the center (in French):</strong> <a href="https://gn.usembassy.gov/fr/le-charge-daffaires-hugues-ogier-en-visite-kindia-pour-la-promotion-de-lentreprenariat-agricole/">Le Chargé d’Affaires Hugues Ogier en Visite à Kindia pour la Promotion de l’Entreprenariat Agricole</a></li> <li><strong>More about the </strong><a href="https://www.cnfa.org/program/feed-the-future-guinea-strengthening-agriculture-value-chains-and-youth/"><strong>AVENIRs</strong> project with CNFA and Winrock</a></li> <li><strong>More from USAID/Guinea</strong> about <a href="https://www.usaid.gov/guinea/environment">Feed the Future Guinea Agricultural Services</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/training-and-extension" hreflang="en">Training and extension</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/field" hreflang="en">From the Field</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/guinea" hreflang="en">Guinea</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-technology field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Technology</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chimney-solar-dryer" hreflang="en">Chimney solar dryer</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 27 Sep 2017 20:32:20 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3221 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Catch up with the Horticulture Innovation Lab at ASHS https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/catch-horticulture-innovation-lab-ashs <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Catch up with the Horticulture Innovation Lab at ASHS</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/ashs-passionfruit-IMG_6531-edits-300dpi-backtoRGB-forBlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="439" alt="close-up on passion fruit, cracked open in hand" title="A farmer in Kenya who worked with Stephen Weller’s international team on African indigenous vegetables shows off a passionfruit fresh from his field. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Brenda Dawson/UC Davis)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 11, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>For horticulturists in the United States, fall means the <a href="http://www.ashs.org/">American Society for Horticultural Science</a> is gathering for its annual conference. Our team at the Horticulture Innovation Lab has been busy preparing to make the trip to Waikoloa, Hawaii, to meet with our partners, colleagues, and fellow horticulture innovators.</p> <p>You can find members of the Horticulture Innovation Lab network in action every day in Waikoloa. For example:</p> <ul><li>Kick off your time at the conference with a “<a href="https://ashs.confex.com/ashs/2017/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/27607">Brief Overview of Horticulture in Hawaii</a>” presented by <strong>Robert Paull</strong> of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, who is also one of the founding members of the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/IABhome.html">International Advisory Board</a>.</li> <li>Come see the insightful work of our <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund</a> fellows, including <strong><a href="https://ashs.confex.com/ashs/2017/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/27100">Tiare Silvasy</a></strong>, as they present posters on their international development experiences.</li> <li>Make sure to get lunch tickets to see our partner from Purdue University, <strong>Stephen Weller</strong> (ask him about <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/nutrition_african_veg.html">African indigenous vegetables</a>!), speaking about how rewarding international work can be at his talk, “<a href="https://ashs.confex.com/ashs/2017/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/26781">Trials, Tribulations and Lessons Learned Over 30 Years of International Horticulture Research</a>.”</li> </ul><p>We know many of our horticulture research colleagues will also be attending the ASHS conference, so let us know in the comments if you will be sharing a presentation or poster, so we can try to connect.</p> <h2>‘Nutrition Security’ special session hosted by the Horticulture Innovation Lab</h2> <p>Open to all ASHS attendees is the Horticulture Innovation Lab special session, “<a href="https://ashs.confex.com/ashs/2017/meetingapp.cgi/Session/8495">Food and Nutrition Security in the Developing World: Challenges and Opportunities</a>,” 12-4 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 20 in the conference meeting room Kohala 1. The goal of this workshop is to have a dialogue about global food security and nutrition security issues and assess the impact of horticulture in certain countries using case studies.</p> <p>Some of our network’s most talented academics and distinguished government partners will be speaking, including <strong>John Bowman</strong> of USAID, <strong>Kate Scow</strong> of UC Davis, <strong>Thibaud Martin</strong> of CIRAD, and <strong>Gurbinder Gill</strong> of Agribusiness Associates. Presentations will include:</p> <ul><li>The Nexus of Food Security &amp; Nutritional Security, Sustainability and Hunger: Multidisciplinary Educational and Research Opportunities and Challenges</li> <li>New Trends in Food Security at USAID: The Role of Horticulture</li> <li>Innovative Technologies to Enhance Availability of Nutritious Foods in Bangladesh</li> <li>Building Horticultural Postharvest Capacity and Entrepreneurship: Experiences from Rwanda and Burkina Faso</li> <li>Insect Exclusion Netting As a Profitable and Affordable Technology for Smallholder Growers to Produce Healthy Vegetables Under Tropical Climates</li> <li>Farmer-Led Innovation in Irrigation for Smallholder Vegetable Production in Uganda</li> <li>African Indigenous Vegetables, a Neglected Treasure, for Improved Nutrition and Income in Eastern and Southern Sub-Saharan Africa</li> </ul><h2>Mitcham takes seat as ASHS Vice President</h2> <p>We are very proud to say that the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s director, Elizabeth Mitcham, will officially begin her term as the Vice President of the International Division for ASHS this year. We think this is a great opportunity for the Horticulture Innovation Lab to further share our development expertise with some of the most qualified horticulturists.</p> <h2>Visit the Horticulture Innovation Lab booth</h2> <p>Lastly, please come by our booth! We will have many of our innovative technologies for the developing world on display, with fruits and vegetables to taste. I will be staffing the booth along with <strong>Angelos Deltsidis</strong>, international postharvest specialist, and <strong>Archie Jarman</strong>, program officer. We are ready to answer questions, discuss international horticulture topics and provide more information about our work. You can also enter a raffle to win a prize by answering one of our very difficult horticulture questions.</p> <p>Aloha! We hope to see you in Hawaii, and if you cannot be there, we look forward to sharing the cutting-edge research we learn about.</p> <h2>More:</h2> <ul><li>Follow <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=tweets&amp;vertical=default&amp;q=%23ASHS2017&amp;src=typd">#ASHS2017 on Twitter</a> for live tweets from the event</li> <li><strong>Horticulture Innovation Lab workshop:</strong> <a href="https://ashs.confex.com/ashs/2017/meetingapp.cgi/Session/8495">Food and Nutritional Security in the Developing World: Challenges and Opportunities</a>, 12-4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20</li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/opportunities" hreflang="en">Opportunities</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> Mon, 11 Sep 2017 20:44:59 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3226 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Inspiring students to help farmers in developing countries (Apply now!) https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/inspiring-students-help-farmers-developing-countries-apply-now <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Inspiring students to help farmers in developing countries (Apply now!)</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 07, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 56.25%"><iframe width="480" height="270" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5BMCAZc2G24?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p><em><strong>Update:</strong> The deadline for students to apply to <a href="https://rfx.piestar.com/opportunities/trellis">5 specific projects in Uganda and Ghana</a> has been extended to Nov. 20, 2017. See details at <a href="https://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund webpage</a>. </em></p> <p>The Horticulture Innovation Lab is recruiting graduate students to take part in <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">15 new Trellis Fund projects</a> in Africa and Asia.</p> <p>Selected students will travel to Nepal, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda or Ghana while providing agricultural expertise to a local organization and their farming clientele.</p> <p>Graduate students who are attending four of the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s partner universities — North Carolina State University, the University of Florida, the University of California, Davis, and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa — are eligible to apply. The deadline for applications is Oct. 27, 2017.</p> <h2>University students work with organizations in developing countries, to help farmers</h2> <p>Each <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund</a> project connects a grad student from an American university with an organization in a developing country, to work together to help local farmers better grow fruits and vegetables. The organization receives a small grant to tackle a specific issue for farmers they work with — related to irrigation, plant nutrition, pest management, postharvest handling, food processing, nutrition, marketing or other agricultural production issues — and works with a graduate student as an agricultural consultant.</p> <p>Students provide agricultural expertise to support the project and help farmers — including 2 weeks of international travel for in-person work. In addition to hands-on experience, students are provided air travel, reimbursement for travel costs and a $300 fellowship upon completion of the project. Students will be required to complete 100 hours of remote work with their partners and participate in a 10-week, online seminar to better prepare for working in international development situations.</p> <p>The Trellis Fund is led by the Horticulture Innovation Lab at UC Davis, in partnership with North Carolina State, the University of Hawai’i at Manoa and the University of Florida. Funding for the Horticulture Innovation Lab comes from the U.S. Agency for International Development as part of Feed the Future, the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative.</p> <p>“We want to inspire young academics to work in the developing world, to realize they can make a big impact in farmers’ lives with agricultural science,” said Erin McGuire, associate director for the Horticulture Innovation Lab. “Our universities are preparing these young people with agricultural skills that they can share far beyond the classroom.”</p> <h2>From Nepal to Ghana, wide array of student international experiences</h2> <p>Since the Trellis Fund started in 2011, more than 47 graduate students have worked on Trellis Fund projects in 20 countries with a wide variety of experiences.</p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Young man pointing to pH strip indicator, with older man looking on, along with other students and Tiare holding the test strips" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="f0a8b0a6-9f49-449d-96e6-eaa71e6dcdc2" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/trellis-tiare-uh-manoa-nepal-IMG_7690-eds-forWeb-1600w.jpg" /><figcaption>Tiare Silvasy, UH Manoa student, discusses soil testing techniques with farmers and student volunteers in Nepal during a Trellis Fund project.</figcaption></figure><p> </p> <p>In one of the most recent projects, a University of Hawai’i student helped farmers in Nepal with their first soil tests to better understand how to manage soil health and fertility. The student, Tiare Silvasy, shared her experiences in a <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/06/university-hawaii-student-helps-farmers-soil-tests-in-nepal/">Q&amp;A blog post and video</a> that she shot with her student partners, the “EcoMinions,” while in Nepal.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="trainer with students at computer" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="bee6e973-2884-4373-bc1b-5debb05cefe8" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/trellis-uf-dev-paudel-ghana-21035137493_ffa11f7327_o-edits-72dpi.jpg" /><figcaption>From left, Dev Paudel of the University of Florida leads students through a computer exercise during a Trellis Fund project in Ghana with the Kayaba Management Foundation. (Photo by Hussein Yunus Alhassan)</figcaption></figure><p>In the prevous round of projects, Dev Paudel, a University of Florida student, led a training for students in Ghana to gain state-of-the-art analysis skills, to better support local horticulture research. <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2016/04/students-help-students-learn-state-of-the-art-science/">Fresh from his time in Ghana</a>, Paudel was optimistic about the students he worked with making use of their training: “I believe this training will be advantageous to the students as they leap into their new careers,” he said.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="group of agricultural researchers, smiling in a field" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="1d991e70-a970-4d52-ba78-6e0c0ec8a8a3" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/trellis-mark-lundy-ucdavis-malawi-DSCF0111-edits-forTwitter3-768x384.jpg" /><figcaption>As a graduate student, Mark Lundy (far left) worked with colleagues in Malawi on tomato production for a Trellis Fund project in 2012.</figcaption></figure><p>Mark Lundy was one of the first UC Davis students to travel on a Trellis Fund project and later became a California farm advisor and UC Cooperative Extension specialist at UC Davis. He reflected back on how his work with an agronomist in Malawi during a Trellis Fund project impacted his own career in a column for the Feed the Future website, “<a href="https://feedthefuture.gov/article/how-global-trip-inspired-californian-focus-locally">How a global trip inspired this Californian to focus locally</a>.”</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Researchers peer at magnifying glass on vegetable root on a farm in Bangladesh" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="679029e4-bc5b-487a-8b0c-cf3b204930b9" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/trellis-brittany-pierce-bangladesh-uc-davis-DSC_0128-2-edits2-sized-forBlog-768x535.jpg" /><figcaption>As a UC Davis graduate student studying plant pathology, Brittany Pierce traveled to Bangladesh to work with farmers and researchers on pest and disease management in vegetable crops, during a Trellis Fund project led by PRIDE.</figcaption></figure><p>Stories from three other UC Davis students were also featured in a Davis Enterprise newspaper article, “<a href="http://www.davisenterprise.com/local-news/ag-environment/international-insights-trellis-students-work-abroad/">Global insights: Trellis students work abroad</a>,” based on their experiences with soil science, pest management, and international agriculture in Kenya, Malawi and Bangladesh.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Grad students: Apply by Oct. 27 for Trellis fellowships</h2> <p>To apply, students can review the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis/2018-students/trellis-project-student-activities.pdf">available Trellis Fund projects</a> for topics, activities and regions that relate to their interests.</p> <p>Based on the available projects, students with expertise in any of these topics are especially encouraged to apply:</p> <ul><li>Postharvest management</li> <li>Fruit and vegetable processing</li> <li>Crop production, including vegetables, kiwi fruit or tropical plants</li> <li>Pest, disease and weed management, including organic controls</li> <li>Soil management, including mulching, composting, biochar, soil tests</li> <li>Small-scale irrigation</li> <li>Agricultural marketing</li> <li>Experimental field design</li> <li>Economic analysis</li> <li>Accounting and business skills</li> </ul><p>Students can select up to three Trellis Fund projects to apply to and will be asked to rank their preferences. For each application, students submit a resume and brief cover letter explaining their interest and related experience. <strong>Applications are due by Oct. 27.</strong></p> <p>See the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html#student-apps">Trellis Fund webpage</a> for complete application instructions, <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis/2018-students/trellis-faq.pdf">Trellis student FAQs</a>, and access to the online application.</p> <p>If you have additional questions, please contact <a href="mailto:trellisfund@ucdavis.edu">trellisfund@ucdavis.edu</a>.</p> <h2>More:</h2> <ul><li><strong>Info:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund webpage</a></li> <li><strong>Watch:</strong> <a href="https://youtu.be/5BMCAZc2G24">Trellis student recruitment video</a></li> <li><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/06/university-hawaii-student-helps-farmers-soil-tests-in-nepal/">UH Manoa student helps with farmers’ first soil tests in Nepal</a></li> <li><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2016/04/students-help-students-learn-state-of-the-art-science/">Students help students learn state-of-the-art science in Ghana</a></li> <li><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2015/04/local-agriculture-knowledge-california-malawi/">‘Local’ inspiration for a California farm advisor from half a world away</a></li> <li><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2015/08/students-trellis-stories-in-davis-enterprise/">Students share Trellis stories from Kenya, Malawi and Bangladesh in Davis Enterprise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.caes.ucdavis.edu/news/articles/outlook/2014/11/copy_of_trellis-fund-opens-door-to-the-developing-world">Trellis Fund opens door to developing world: UC Davis soil student visits Bangladesh</a></li> <li><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2016/05/thanks-from-uganda-why-the-trellis-fund-matters/">Thanks from Uganda: Why the Trellis Fund matters</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/opportunities" hreflang="en">Opportunities</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/trellis" hreflang="en">Trellis</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students" hreflang="en">students</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/videos-multimedia" hreflang="en">Videos &amp; Multimedia</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> Thu, 07 Sep 2017 20:50:24 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3231 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu New project combines vegetables and livestock in Cambodian farming https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/new-project-combines-vegetables-and-livestock-cambodian-farming <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New project combines vegetables and livestock in Cambodian farming</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/cambodia-pig-farmer-vegetable-feed-35957143790_2c1575ae79_o_croped.jpg" width="825" height="367" alt="Cambodian pig farmer with sow" title="Farmers on small plots of land in Cambodia sometimes care for one or two pigs in addition to a vegetable garden and rice fields, a situation that offers opportunities for the Horticulture Innovation Lab to develop integrated strategies. (Photo by Jessie Vipham/Kansas State University)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">August 21, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em>A version of this article first appeared on the <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/one-health/combining-vegetables-livestock-cambodian-farming">UC Davis One Health blog</a>. </em></p> <p>New research supported by the Horticulture Innovation Lab at UC Davis aims to help farmers in Cambodia better integrate growing vegetables, raising livestock and maintaining healthy soil — all in the same place.</p> <p>“By understanding the interactions between horticulture and livestock systems, we can help farmers make better use of agricultural inputs such as fertilizer and labor, which will help improve a farmer’s bottom line,” says <a href="/people/erin-mcguire">Erin McGuire, associate director of the program</a>, which is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development.</p> <p>“Systems thinking” is critical to making a real-world impact in global food security, according to <a href="/people/jessie-vipham">Jessie Vipham</a>, project leader for the new $750,000 project and assistant professor at Kansas State University’s <a href="http://www.k-state.edu/siil/">Sustainable Intensification Innovation Lab</a>.</p> <p>“Too often overlooked is that systems piece, the very fact that these things — crops and livestock, soil health and human health — play together. It’s not always enough to study a single piece of the pie,” Vipham says.</p> <h2>Combining conservation agriculture with swine and cattle</h2> <p>As part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative “<a href="https://feedthefuture.gov/">Feed the Future</a>,” the Horticulture Innovation Lab already has research in Cambodia helping farmers better <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2015/04/conservation-ag-reducing-drudgery-improve-soil-for-vegetable-farmers/">grow vegetables using conservation agriculture practices</a>. This combination of practices improves soil health through continuous mulch, no tillage and diverse crop rotation.</p> <p>“When we visited the farms our researchers have been working with in Cambodia, they already had animals there. Figuring out how to best utilize their livestock is just smart,” McGuire says.</p> <p>Because the Cambodians were sensitive to using pesticides and other synthetic supplements, they were interested in substituting manure and other livestock byproducts, she reports.</p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Cambodian pig feed researcher" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="6cb30dd4-61bb-4abd-8799-06f74045d4e0" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/cambodia-pig-farmer-morning-glory-35501365264_91accdc2c1_o-768x1024.jpg" /><figcaption>A host farmer oversees Channaty Ngang, right, a student from the University of Battambang, while she chops up morning glory for the farm’s pigs. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Erin McGuire/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><h2>Manure vs. mulch</h2> <p>With farmers near Siem Reap — the city closest to Cambodia’s famous Angkor Wat temple complex — the team’s research will focus on integrating pigs with crops. One question the team will investigate is whether vegetable plant residues, which aren’t used for human food, might be used to better feed pigs instead of being used as mulch.</p> <p>The Horticulture Innovation Lab team will investigate whether pig manure might take the place of that mulch and the various trade-offs in using manure vs. mulch.</p> <p>Farther west, near the city of Battambang, farmers are more interested in cattle. Vipham explained that in this region cattle are often valued as a type of income safety net. If a farmer suddenly needs some money, then the family can sell their cow.</p> <p>Research trials will likely focus on ways to maintain a cow’s physical condition (and potentially its selling price) with crops grown for livestock feed, alongside the farmers’ usual vegetable crops for sale and human consumption.</p> <h2>Advancing science while building local capacity</h2> <p>The American team will be working with Cambodian scientists from the <a href="http://ubb.edu.kh/">University of Battambang</a> and the <a href="http://www.rua.edu.kh/">Royal University of Agriculture</a>. The international group met recently in Cambodia to explore research sites and make plans to move forward. Vipham is encouraged to see the scientists come together as a team.</p> <p>“It’s one thing to make plans and write a grant proposal,” Vipham says. “It’s a totally different thing when you have your livestock scientists and horticulturalists and soil scientists on the ground, looking at the same thing, and you can see their wheels start to turn.”</p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Agricultural researchers in Cambodia" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="1831eb6d-2d61-45b1-8cdc-20e95200b79c" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/cambodia-horticulture-researchers-36309586266_b9597f8dfc_o.jpg" /><figcaption>From left, technician Pok Panha shows Gabe Sampson and Zachary Stewart with Kansas State University a field trial area at the new Center of Excellence on Sustainable Agricultural Intensification and Nutrition technology park in Siem Reap. (Jessie Vipham/Kansas State University)</figcaption></figure><p>One of the Cambodian researchers, Lyda Hok, is director of the <a href="https://www.k-state.edu/siil/whatwedo/currentprojects/cesain/index.html">Center of Excellence on Sustainable Agricultural Intensification and Nutrition</a>, which includes five new “technology parks” where the team’s research will take place.</p> <p>“With the five technology parks, we will be able to share this useful information and recommendations to more farmers throughout the country,” Hok says.</p> <p>“Visiting these technology parks, you can feel how they are modeled after the American agricultural extension system to help move new agricultural practices from scientists to farmers,” UC Davis’ McGuire says. “By partnering with the Cambodian scientists for this research, we are also helping to support those efforts to rebuild Cambodia’s agricultural extension system.”</p> <h2>Helping farmers make their own best decisions</h2> <p>Hok and his colleagues at the Royal University of Agriculture have been working with U.S. university researchers connected to the Horticulture Innovation Lab since 2010. He says these partnerships are an important part of the problem-solving process.</p> <p>“We have the same goal, to extend successful agricultural technologies to benefit more farmers, especially smallholder farmers,” he says.</p> <p>Ultimately the team will distill the research findings into several documents aimed at helping farmers consider new practices, understand the trade-offs and make informed decisions about managing their farms.</p> <p>“It all comes back to: How do we help make these decisions easier for farmers? They already have so much they’re dealing with,” Vipham says.</p> <p>“Increasing productivity is important for generating income, but if I’m a farmer, what does that mean for conserving my resources? What does that mean for my ability to feed my children?”</p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li><strong>Project webpage:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/livestock-integration.html">Investigating integrated vegetable-livestock systems in Cambodia</a></li> <li>More about the <a href="https://www.k-state.edu/siil/whatwedo/currentprojects/cesain/index.html">Center of Excellence on Sustainable Agricultural Intensification and Nutrition (CE SAIN) in Cambodia</a></li> <li>One Health blog version of this article: <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/one-health/combining-vegetables-livestock-cambodian-farming">Combining Vegetables and Livestock in Cambodian Farming</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/fruit-and-vegetable-production" hreflang="en">Fruit and vegetable production</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/food-safety" hreflang="en">Food safety</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/announcement" hreflang="en">Announcement</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/livestock" hreflang="en">livestock</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/cambodia" hreflang="en">Cambodia</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 21 Aug 2017 21:01:00 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3241 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu How new apricot research can help farmers and reduce poverty in Tajikistan https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/how-new-apricot-research-can-help-farmers-and-reduce-poverty-tajikistan <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">How new apricot research can help farmers and reduce poverty in Tajikistan</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/tajikistan-apricots-dried-IMG_0005-crop-forBlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="253" alt="close-up on hands holding dried apricots" title="Dried apricots offer a profitable opportunity for farmers in Tajikistan. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Amanda Deering/Purdue University)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">July 27, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em>Apricots offer farmers in southern Tajikistan a profitable opportunity — particularly when dried for export to foreign markets.</em></p> <p><em>In a region where 10 percent of the population lives on less than $1.25 per day, an international team led by U.S. scientists is digging into a new research project to help, advancing the science behind growing, drying, and selling these golden fruits.</em></p> <h2>Long history, new opportunities for apricot farmers in Tajikistan</h2> <p>Apricots have a long history in Tajikistan, as part of a region that is rich in apricot biodiversity (and potentially where the fruit originated). While apricots are grown widely across the country, farmers in northern Tajikistan in particular have well established commercial production and drying operations. More than 80 percent of Tajikistan’s dried apricots are exported to Russia, the world’s largest importer of dried fruit.</p> <p>In 2015 a frost in northern Tajikistan presented southern farmers with a new opportunity. The frost prompted processors to look farther afield for apricots — including to farmers in the country’s southwestern Khatlon province, where the U.S. Agency for International Development is working to reduce poverty. (USAID notes that Tajikistan, on the northern border of Afghanistan, is a “<a href="https://www.usaid.gov/tajikistan">linchpin for stability and security</a>” for Central Asia.)</p> <p>The Khatlon province in particular is part of the U.S. government’s <a href="https://www.feedthefuture.gov/country/tajikistan">Feed the Future</a> strategy, as a key agricultural region with some of the highest rates of poverty and undernutrition in this post-conflict country. Farmers here grew cotton as part of a Soviet-era policy, but — following a civil war and increased access to land rights — have more recently returned to fruit and vegetable production. Thus horticultural production has been identified by USAID as a top priority for food security, with potential to boost rural incomes and improve household nutrition.</p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="apricots drying on tarp on ground in shed, with tractor behind" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="f70b33ff-6649-4ceb-92bb-f9d5d3329400" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/tajikistan-apricots-farm-IMG_8035-edits-crop-forBlog-768x740.jpg" /><figcaption>Improving apricot drying practices could help Tajik farmers increase profits and access export markets. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Erin McGuire/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><h2>New international team advances science for better apricot drying</h2> <p>To advance USAID’s efforts with Tajik farmers, the Horticulture Innovation Lab — led by the University of California, Davis — is supporting a new research project that focuses on<a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/apricot-tajikistan.html"> improving postharvest practices for dried apricots</a>. The new $300,000 project is led by Purdue University researchers with an international team.</p> <p>“We are proud to be able to connect American agricultural scientists with USAID team members who are already working in Tajikistan. This is a smart way to focus our investments in agricultural research,” said <a href="/people/erin-mcguire">Erin McGuire</a>, associate director of the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/">Horticulture Innovation Lab</a> at UC Davis. “Working together will result in better solutions that can be used by farmers more immediately.”</p> <p>Leading the project is <a href="/people/peter-hirst">Peter Hirst</a>, a horticulture professor at Purdue University and tree fruit extension specialist for farmers in Indiana. He recently served in Tajikistan with the Farmer-to-Farmer program, where he taught workshops for women farmers on grafting fruit trees, and also has experience working with orchards in Afghanistan and Kyrgyzstan.</p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Researchers stands in front of giant apricot statue in a traffic circle in Isfara." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="b6693a1d-ee18-4822-84c3-06ceffc004a8" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/tajikistan-apricot-monument-researchers-IMG_0010-edits-forWeb-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>Professors from Purdue University and Tajik Agrarian University, part of this project’s international team, pose in front of an apricot monument in the northern Tajikistan city of Isfara, where apricot production is well established commercially. From left: Amanda Deering, Siadali Gulov, Ariana Torres, Rustam Bobohonov, and Klein Ileleji.</figcaption></figure><p>On an introductory trip for this project, Hirst was impressed with the practices used by apricot farmers in the northern part of the country and with his new partners at <a href="http://www.tajagroun.tj/en/">Tajik Agrarian University</a>.</p> <p>“I was really encouraged. I saw tremendous potential and met a lot of good people wanting to advance their production practices,” Hirst said. “We’re really looking forward to continuing collaboration with the faculty members at the university. That kind of collaboration has the potential to pay off over a long period of time, with students and the agriculture industry benefiting for years.”</p> <p>By working with TAU and also with the USAID-funded <a href="https://www.usaid.gov/tajikistan/press-releases/jan-29-2016-us-government-launches-new-food-security-activity">Feed the Future Tajikistan Agriculture and Water Activity project</a>, the researchers can find more appropriate solutions and better share them with farmers and local industry.</p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Tajik women sort apricots after harvest on wooden trays for drying" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="89722824-8dfb-4cc8-ba42-53e34a12ae35" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/tajiistan-aprictos-women-farmers-IMG_8055-edits-crop-forBlog-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>After harvest, women farmers spread apricots on a tray to begin drying, during a workshop in Tajikistan led by the Feed the Future Tajikistan Agriculture and Water Activity project. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Erin McGuire/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><h2>Improving food safety, postharvest handling among women farmers</h2> <p>Connecting with women farmers will be especially important to the success of this project, as women predominate the labor force in the region’s fruit and vegetable fields.</p> <p>“I’m so looking forward to working with the women we met,” said Purdue’s Amanda Deering, who recently returned from Tajikistan as the professor who will focus on microbial food safety. “They wanted to learn more. They said if someone would show us how to do it, we’ll do it. So I’m excited.”</p> <p>Together with the project team, she will assess food safety challenges and quality parameters to develop educational materials that improve postharvest handling practices. The team has also started a market analysis to better understand commercial potential for apricot drying in southern Tajikistan.</p> <p>The Purdue team’s next step is to test out four ways of drying apricots, first in Indiana and later with partners in Tajikistan — comparing traditional open-air drying against a low-cost “solar wrap” dryer, a multipurpose chamber dryer, and a <a href="/chimney-solar-dryer">chimney solar dryer</a>.</p> <p>“We don’t need to change the whole industry, but hopefully we can get the ball rolling,” Hirst said. “If we can change a few growers’ practices, then others will see their success and those changes can become self-sufficient.”</p> <p><em>This project is supported by the Horticulture Innovation Lab with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development, as part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative called Feed the Future. Led by UC Davis, the Horticulture Innovation Lab builds international partnerships for fruit and vegetable research that improves livelihoods in developing countries. </em><a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/"><em>http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/</em></a></p> <p> </p> <h3>More information:</h3> <ul><li><strong>Project webpage:</strong> <a href="/project/apricot-tajikistan">Improving practices for dried apricots in Tajikistan</a></li> <li>More <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHsm3VscHE">project photos from Tajikistan</a></li> <li>More about USAID in Tajikistan: <a href="https://www.usaid.gov/tajikistan/our-work">USAID/Tajikistan country profile</a> and <a href="https://www.feedthefuture.gov/country/tajikistan">Feed the Future in Tajikistan</a></li> <li><a href="https://medium.com/@USAIDEnviro/harvesting-sweet-success-dedfff700af6">Harvesting sweet success</a>, article about USAID’s support of Tajik land rights and apricot orchards</li> <li><a href="http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/48/6/681.full">Genetic Resources of Apricots in Central Asia</a>, article in <em>HortScience</em> June 2013</li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/postharvest-practices" hreflang="en">Postharvest practices</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/announcement" hreflang="en">Announcement</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/tajikistan" hreflang="en">Tajikistan</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-crop field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Crop</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/crop/apricot" hreflang="en">Apricot</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 27 Jul 2017 21:06:03 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3246 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu Should I use pest-exclusion nets? 7 tips from Sun Tzu’s Art of War https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/should-i-use-pest-exclusion-nets-7-tips-sun-tzus-art-war <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Should I use pest-exclusion nets? 7 tips from Sun Tzu’s Art of War</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/pest-exclusion-nets-cambodia-Group-1-DSCF4052_DSCF4054-3-images-BlogHeader.jpg" width="825" height="307" alt="Farmer group sets up net tunnel in Cambodia" title="In Cambodia, farmers are building tunnels with pest-exclusion nets as part of the Feed the Future Asia Innovative Farmers Activity. Partners on this project include Winrock International and the Horticulture Innovation Lab Regional Center at Kasetsart University, among others. Previous Horticulture Innovation Lab research with nets in Cambodia showed that farmers there were indeed interested in this technology that can help reduce pesticide use. (Photo by Kim Fooyontphanich/Kasetsart University)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">July 05, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Poon Kasemsap portrait" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="6a96ddfc-5923-40c4-bdc8-cdcc6626f408" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/Kasemsap-Poon-IMG_3788-forBlog-214x300_1.jpg" /><figcaption>Poon Kasemsap, of Kasetsart University in Thailand</figcaption></figure><p><em><strong>Editor’s note: </strong></em><em>This blog post by Poonpipope “Poon” Kasemsap was originally a <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/Kasemsap_Pest_Nets_Thailand.pdf">presentation</a> given at the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/">Horticulture Innovation Lab’s 2017 annual meeting</a>. </em></p> <p><em>Kasemsap an associate professor at Kasetsart University in Thailand and also the director of the <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/center_kasetsart.html">Horticulture Innovation Lab Regional Center at KU</a>. The center brings together key regional players to circulate technical assistance and innovative technologies in support of smallholder farmers and small business in Thailand, Cambodia, Bangladesh and Nepal. </em></p> <p>Pest-exclusion nets are one of the technologies for horticulture development promoted by the Horticulture Innovation Lab. The nets can be easy to use and can also serve as floating row covers to control temperature, light, relative humidity and soil moisture for plant production. Some of the pest-exclusion nets used by Horticulture Innovation Lab researchers are made and marketed locally by mosquito net manufacturers.</p> <p>But why should you consider using nets for pest management? Here are 7 considerations in adopting nets for agricultural use, inspired by Sun Tzu’s <em>The Art of War</em>:</p> <ol><li><strong>The greatest victory is that which requires no battle:</strong><br /> The nets create a <em>barrier</em> that protects vegetables against pests and associated diseases, and thus provide an inexpensive and safe method of managing insect pests while reducing risks associated with pesticides to both farmers and consumers. The pest-exclusion nets provide an excellent example of victory (against certain insects) which requires no battle (insecticide). Winrock International chose pest-exclusion nets to be the initial horticulture package in <a href="https://www.winrock.org/new-u-s-project-links-asian-farmers-with-affordable-technology/">Feed the Future Asia Innovative Farmers Activity</a> project funded by USAID.</li> <li><strong>Know yourself</strong>:<br /> This tip focuses on flexibility, convenience and versatility. Pest-exclusion nets could serve as floating row or field covers with no permanent structure or be built into several types of structure including net-box, low tunnels, medium tunnels, high tunnels or full canopy, depending on the crops or financial factors.</li> <li><strong>Know your enemy</strong>:<br /> The pest-exclusion nets have a potential to help protect against a wide range of potential problem insects and animals such as flying foxes, birds, fruit piercing moths, fruit spotting bugs, macadamia nut borers, fruit flies, wallabies, hares and possums. In order to choose the appropriate material and structure for the nets (including mesh size), it is essential that farmers know (a) what insects/animals they need to exclude from the crops and (b) the potential changes in the micro-climate inside the nets. <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Two university scientists stand in front of net structures, with vegetable plants growing inside." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3d2f75fd-fbf9-4239-b710-4fa4f152b803" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/pest-exclusion-nets-cambodia-rua-DSCF2065-768x512.jpg" /><figcaption>Borarin Buntong and Soth Hong, researchers from the Royal University of Agriculture in Cambodia, stand in front of a campus experiment comparing two different types of net structures with eggplant, tomato, Chinese kale, pak choy and Chinese mustard — in partnership with researchers from Kasetsart University and Winrock International. (Photo by Kim Fooyontphanich/Kasetsart University)</figcaption></figure></li> <li><strong>Every battle is won before it is fought</strong>:<br /> It is obvious that careful analysis, planning, and preparation are the main key success factors for the implementation of the pest-exclusion net technology. In addition, other non-production technical factors such as logistics and marketing would likely be significantly important. For example, applying pest-exclusion nets to jasmine production has been possible and substantially profitable because of much higher price command during the winter season. Success from adopting pest-exclusion nets relies on careful planning, both on- and off-farm. <p><span> </span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-left"><img alt="farmer rests his hand on the outside of a nethouse, with foot resting on irrigation pipe" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="6ef6fe05-56da-4055-8f9e-d7ac0d98cf50" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/pest-exclusion-nets-cambodia-farmer-horticultureinnovationlab-IMG_4253-edit-crop-forWeb-768x512.jpg" /><figcaption>Ta Keo of Cambodia’s Kandal province was an early adopter of net houses, with neighboring farmers learning from his success during a Horticulture Innovation Lab project led by UC Davis with partnership from RUA. (Horticulture Innovation Lab photo by Brenda Dawson/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure></li> <li><strong>Opportunities multiply as they are seized</strong>:<br /> Early adopters serve as models for local dissemination. Successes by early adopters of certain technologies could lead to more opportunity by everyone in the local village. If one farmer in the rural village of Chiang Mai invests successfully in pest-exclusion nets to produce high quality, organic vegetables, then several more farmers in the same village start to learn from him. The group can keep expanding until it has enough visibility and thus providing more opportunities and bargaining power with buyers.</li> <li><strong>Move only if there is a real advantage to be gained</strong>:<br /> Once successful, there are tendencies to over-expand. It is crucial for the farmers to analyze carefully the marginal cost and marginal gain. They must decide to implement the pest-exclusion nets only if there is real advantage to be gained. Keep in mind that every technology has limitations.</li> <li><strong>If a battle cannot be won, do not fight it:</strong><br /> If careful analysis provides the result that risk is too high with low or no return on investment, do not insist on continuing with the implementation of the technology. Pest-exclusion nets are not going to be successful everywhere in the world. There will be other circumstances that this technology will be useful and valuable.</li> </ol><h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li>More about the <strong><a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/center_kasetsart.html">Horticulture Innovation Lab Regional Center at Kasetsart University</a></strong></li> <li><strong>Nets factsheet PDF:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/media%20page/technologies_nets.pdf">Pest-exclusion nets protect crops to boost yield</a></li> <li><strong>Nets-related research project:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/projects/scaling-nets-feasibility.html">Assessing feasibility of pest-exclusion nets in Kenya</a></li> <li><strong>Nets-related blog post:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/06/5-ways-relationships-promote-innovation-food-safety/">5 ways relationships promote innovation – and can improve food safety</a></li> <li>More <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/tag/5-minute-lesson/">5-Minute Lesson blog posts</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/pest-management" hreflang="en">Pest management</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/expert-list" hreflang="en">List from an Expert</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/5-minute-lessons" hreflang="en">5-Minute Lessons</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/thailand" hreflang="en">Thailand</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/cambodia" hreflang="en">Cambodia</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-technology field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Technology</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/nets" hreflang="en">Pest-exclusion nets</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-related-centers field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Center(s)</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/center/kasetsart-university" hreflang="en">Horticulture Innovation Lab Regional Center at Kasetsart University</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 06 Jul 2017 01:11:46 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3531 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu UH Manoa student helps with farmers’ first soil tests in Nepal https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/blog/uh-manoa-student-helps-farmers-first-soil-tests-nepal <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">UH Manoa student helps with farmers’ first soil tests in Nepal</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Primary Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/impact_stories/trellis-uhmanoa-nepal-20170414_104243-BlogHeader3.jpg" width="825" height="389" alt="Grad student woman looking at paper test indicator offered by a Nepalese man, with group looking on at farm" title="Tiare Silvasy, UH Manoa student, discusses soil testing techniques with farmers and student volunteers in Nepal during a Trellis Fund project. (Photo by Saroj Khanal)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brenda Dawson</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">June 28, 2017</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Tiare Silvasy portrait" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4686ef75-809b-4280-876d-cee074d2797d" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/silvasy-tiare-uh-manoa-IMGP3169_square-cropforBlog-214x300.jpg" /><figcaption>Tiare Silvasy, UH Mānoa graduate student who participated in Trellis Fund project in Nepal</figcaption></figure><p><em>Editor’s no</em><em>te: Tiare Silvasy is a master’s student in Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa who participated in a </em><a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html"><em>Trellis Fund project</em></a><em> led by the Center for Agricultural Research and Development (CARD-Nepal). She recently returned from a trip to Nepal to work on this project, which focused on soil testing and nutrient management for smallholder farmers — many of whom had never had a soil test before. Here’s a Q&amp;A with highlights from her trip.</em></p> <p><strong>Question: How does your work on this Trellis Fund project fit into your studies and career?</strong></p> <p><strong>Tiare Silvasy: </strong>In Hawaii, my thesis is on nutrient management and I’m looking at local organic fertilizers, specifically at meat and bone meal, produced locally here from the islands’ fish and meat wastes. We’re looking at using those local materials on our farmer’s fields, instead of importing fertilizer products. Meat and bone meal contain a relatively high amount of nitrogen for an organic fertilizer.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Young man pointing to pH strip indicator, with older man looking on, along with other students and Tiare holding the test strips" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="dae6821e-1360-485f-8668-0ac2b073c4f2" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/trellis-uhmanoa-nepal-IMG_7690-eds-forWeb-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>Silvasy and students from Nepal explain soil test results to a farmer. (Photo by Saroj Khanal)</figcaption></figure><p><strong>Tell us about the main work you did on this Trellis Fund project during this trip.</strong></p> <p>The farmers we met with in Nepal had never had a soil test done and didn’t really know what their soil’s baseline nutrients were. A lot of them are using farmyard manure produced from dung from their animals, and putting it on their fields.</p> <p>The day after we arrived, we started with the field work. For two groups of farmers, we repeated this routine: one day soil testing and another day farmer training.</p> <p>Our training was PowerPoint presentations and hands-on demonstrations. The team from CARD-Nepal had presentations in Nepali; Rajendra Regmi presented on pest control and Sameer Magar presented on nutrient management. My presentation was about using crop rotation to improve pest and nutrient management in English, and they translated for me.</p> <p>Some farmers brought a soil sample to us, or we would visit their farm and do a soil sampling demonstration to show them how to do it. All of the farmers in these villages were within walking distance. There were at least 20 farmers in each group. Between the two groups, we did 46 soil samples total. We had a pH meter and color test strips for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Most of their soil was sandy texture, maybe of the Inceptisols order in soil taxonomy.</p> <p>We broke our soil test results into three broad categories and recommendations. Either:</p> <ul><li>your soil is a little deficient and you should add nutrients</li> <li>your soil is in a good range</li> <li>your soil results were high, don’t add fertilizer</li> </ul><p>The farmers were really interested to see the results and understand the interpretation. A lot of them used farmyard manure as their only input.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Close-up of hand showing Nitrogen color indicator strip, with Nepalese writing" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="61fb0a98-b281-4390-95b3-30bdd781e712" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1816/files/inline-images/trellis-uh-manoa-nepal-IMG_7678-edits-forBlog-768x576.jpg" /><figcaption>In addition to a pH meter, the group used color test strips to test for soil nitrogen (pictured) as well as for phosphorus and potassium.</figcaption></figure><p>We also sat down with the farmers and did surveys, which I developed before I went to Nepal along with Rajan Ghimire (of CARD-Nepal). That’s how we found out most of the farmers had never done soil testing before, so it’s good to have that documented. There was only one farmer we found through the survey was using sesbania as a green manure; we use a lot of green manures here in America, and that could cut the farmer’s fertilizer needs significantly.</p> <p>Going forward, we’re going to develop a poster and a manual, for soil testing and understanding the results. And I’m planning to present a scientific poster on this project at the <a href="http://www.ashs.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=866813">American Society for Horticultural Science conference this summer</a>.</p> <p><strong>Were there any surprises in your work?</strong></p> <p>One big surprise to me was when I visited the soil science lab at the Agriculture and Forestry University (AFU) in Rampur where the students I was working with study, they had a few machines but really had little to no equipment, so the stuff that I brought with me was a really big help and we were able to purchase additional supplies at a local farm distributor shop. I was kind of surprised at their lack of access to technology. Earlier in the project, I was looking at the list of people I would be working with — many are soil scientists with Ph.D.s — and I was wondering, what am I going to bring to the project? So I was glad to see the equipment [purchased with a Trellis Fund supplemental student fellowship] was especially useful.</p> <p><strong>Does this experience change what you think about working internationally?</strong></p> <p>I’ve done a couple of projects internationally, always integrating farming projects with my own travel. I started <a href="http://wwoof.net/">WWOOFing</a> in Costa Rica, and then also worked in permaculture in Australia, and did some projects in Panama and Colombia.</p> <p>I would like to do more work like this in the future. When I graduate I want to work in teaching, research and extension. I had a good experience on this project, and it just makes me want to do more of this kind of work.</p> <p><strong>What would you say to other students who might be considering participating in a Trellis project, in the future? Any advice?</strong></p> <p>I would say it’s a really great opportunity for students who have a service-oriented mind and want to travel and engage in projects internationally. I was excited to learn about this opportunity because as a student you can’t take a lot of time off. But to go for just 2 weeks and have a meaningful protect to work on and your plane ticket taken care of — that’s big.</p> <p><em>The <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund</a> is managed by the Horticulture Innovation Lab at UC Davis, in partnership NC State, UH Mānoa and UF. The Horticulture Innovation Lab is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, as part of Feed the Future, the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative.</em></p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 56.25%"><iframe width="480" height="270" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/l0ROyf7wLFQ?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p><em>Video above: Tiare Silvasy made <a href="https://youtu.be/l0ROyf7wLFQ">a short video</a> about her experiences doing soil testing for farmers in Nepal with the Eco-Minions student club and the Center for Agriculture and Research Development (CARD-Nepal), as part of a Trellis Fund project.</em></p> <p> </p> <h2>More information:</h2> <ul><li><a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis.html">Trellis Fund webpage</a></li> <li><strong>2016-2017 Students:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2017/01/students-selected-for-trellis-projects-in-ghana-uganda-kenya-nepal-cambodia/">Students selected for projects in Ghana, Uganda, Kenya, Nepal, Cambodia</a></li> <li><strong>2016-2017 Projects selected:</strong> <a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/2016/09/nine-new-trellis-fund-projects-awarded/">Nine new Trellis Fund projects awarded</a></li> <li><strong>Fact sheet:</strong> <a href="http://horticulture.ucdavis.edu/main/trellis/trellis-factsheet-2016.pdf">2016-2017 Trellis Fund fact sheet</a> (PDF)</li> <li><a href="https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu/category/program/trellis/">Recent blog posts about the Trellis Fund</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-value-chain field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Value Chain</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/value-chain-part/soil-and-irrigation" hreflang="en">Soil and irrigation</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/qa-interview" hreflang="en">Q&amp;A Interview</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/trellis" hreflang="en">Trellis</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/videos-multimedia" hreflang="en">Videos &amp; Multimedia</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students" hreflang="en">students</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Article Type</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/article-type/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-countries field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Countries</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/country/nepal" hreflang="en">Nepal</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 29 Jun 2017 01:21:33 +0000 Brenda Dawson 3536 at https://blog.horticulture.ucdavis.edu