9 tips for incorporating gender into a research project

From the leaders of our new gender-focused project, of Penn State and Zamorano universities, here are some tips to get you thinking about gender-responsive projects:

group photo: Arie, Janelle and Leif
From left, Arie Sanders of Zamorano, Janelle Larson and Leif Jensen (both of Penn State) kicked off a Horticulture Innovation Lab project focused on gender equity and the horticultural value chain in Honduras.
  1. Incorporate and mainstream gender considerations from the inception of the project. Avoid “add and stir” approaches to gender, that is, simply adding gender as a factor without thinking through the range of ways it might infuse your work. A full incorporation might have impacts on decisions about staffing, scheduling time “in the field,” timing of outreach efforts, connecting with “gatekeepers,” and designing gender-specific activities.
  2. Be aware of the cultural context. Constraints that women (and others) face vary between and within societies, regions, localities and households.
  3. Be attentive to interactions between gender and other categories such as race and ethnicity, social class, and life-stage.
  4. When evaluating a specific intervention or issue, give careful thought to sampling design to ensure meaningful participation of women. Continue reading 9 tips for incorporating gender into a research project

AIARD honors Amanda Crump for distinguished service

Amanda Crump, our program’s associate director, was honored recently by the Association for International Agriculture and Rural Development (AIARD) with its Award for Distinguished Service.

The award honors public service and major contributions to the association’s objectives — namely, improving global capacity to eliminate poverty, improve food security, conserve the environment, and stimulate economic growth. The award was presented at the AIARD Annual Conference, June 1 in Washington, D.C.

Amanda Crump portrait
Amanda Crump

As the associate director for the Horticulture Innovation Lab at UC Davis, Crump leads the program’s gender equity focus and is responsible for monitoring a portfolio of research projects. Her own research focuses on novel practices for agricultural extension education for farmers — particularly women — in developing countries. She also leads the UC Davis portion of a multi-university program focused on integrating gender and nutrition into agricultural extension services in several countries, called INGENEAS.

Crump has served as the Continue reading AIARD honors Amanda Crump for distinguished service

Videos: Meet Zambian women who grow indigenous vegetables

African indigenous vegetables and women who grow them in Zambia are the subject of two videos made by a team from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

As a student with the Rutgers Center for Digital Filmmaking, Jeanpaul Isaacs visited Livingstone to meet the Nsongwe Women’s Group. These women are growing vegetables with support from the Agribusiness in Sustainable Natural African Plant Products (ASNAPP) organization and Rutgers Professor Jim Simon.

The Horticulture Innovation Lab has worked with Simon, ASNAPP, and a team of international partners on improving the value chain for African indigenous vegetables in Zambia and Kenya. We are currently working with this team to develop a project focused on how growing and selling these vegetables can impact farmer nutrition, as related to household consumption and dietary diversity (announcement).

In the first video, Simon narrates the story behind how Continue reading Videos: Meet Zambian women who grow indigenous vegetables

Newsletter: Upcoming postharvest event, opportunities

Here is a copy of the email newsletter we sent out to our subscribers this week. We post our newsletters here, but you can always subscribe for next time. Enjoy!

We’re excited to see more interest in improving postharvest practices as a way to increase income and reduce food loss. In a few months, the Horticulture Innovation Lab will be sponsoring an ISHS symposium in Cambodia focused on postharvest issues. Now is the time to submit an abstract, if you’d like to share your research results or expertise at this event. Please enjoy the highlights and other updates below, or Continue reading Newsletter: Upcoming postharvest event, opportunities

Event: International postharvest symposium in Cambodia

Update: The deadline to submit an abstract has been extended to June 30, with early registration available until July 15.

Cambodia will be the setting for the International Society for Horticultural Science’s third “Southeast Asia Symposium on Quality Management in Postharvest Systems.” The symposium will be Aug. 13-15 in Siem Reap.

This ISHS event will highlight innovations related to postharvest aspects of the horticultural value chain, including food safety, reducing postharvest losses, processing, fresh-cut, packaging, microbiology, supply chain management, and seed quality.

May 30 June 30 is the deadline to submit an abstract.

Who is participating

Agricultural scholars from universities, government ministries, and non-governmental organizations will attend, from countries throughout Southeast Asia and the rest of the world. University students are also encouraged to participate.

“This is a great chance for students to publish and learn a lot about new technologies and new research—especially for students in Cambodia, since there’s not many chances for them to go abroad to other international conferences,” said Borarin Buntong, one of the organizers. Continue reading Event: International postharvest symposium in Cambodia