Newsletter: 3 ways to catch up with the Horticulture Innovation Lab network

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We hope this newsletter finds you well! We have been busy launching new research projects, preparing for upcoming events, and beginning student recruitment for a new round of Trellis Fund projects. Catch up with our latest news below, and please share opportunities with your colleagues who might be interested.

Here are three immediate ways you can interact with the Horticulture Innovation Lab network: Continue reading Newsletter: 3 ways to catch up with the Horticulture Innovation Lab network

Catch up with the Horticulture Innovation Lab at ASHS

For horticulturists in the United States, fall means the American Society for Horticultural Science is gathering for its annual conference. Our team at the Horticulture Innovation Lab has been busy preparing to make the trip to Waikoloa, Hawaii, to meet with our partners, colleagues, and fellow horticulture innovators.

You can find members of the Horticulture Innovation Lab network in action every day in Waikoloa. For example:

We know many of our horticulture research colleagues will also be attending the ASHS conference, so let us know in the comments if you will be sharing a presentation or poster, so we can try to connect.

‘Nutrition Security’ special session hosted by the Horticulture Innovation Lab

Open to all ASHS attendees is the Horticulture Innovation Lab special session, “Food and Nutrition Security in the Developing World: Challenges and Opportunities,” 12-4 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 20 in the conference meeting room . The goal of this workshop is to have a dialogue about global food security and nutrition security issues and assess the impact of horticulture in certain countries using case studies.

Some of our network’s most talented academics and Continue reading Catch up with the Horticulture Innovation Lab at ASHS

Inspiring students to help farmers in developing countries (Apply now!)

Update: The deadline for students to apply to 5 specific projects in Uganda and Ghana has been extended to Nov. 20, 2017. See details at Trellis Fund webpage

The Horticulture Innovation Lab is recruiting graduate students to take part in 15 new Trellis Fund projects in Africa and Asia.

Selected students will travel to Nepal, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda or Ghana while providing agricultural expertise to a local organization and their farming clientele.

Graduate students who are attending four of the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s partner universities — North Carolina State University, the University of Florida, the University of California, Davis, and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa — are eligible to apply. The deadline for applications is Oct. 27, 2017.

University students work with organizations in developing countries, to help farmers

Each Trellis Fund project connects a grad student from an American university with an organization in a developing country, to work together to help local farmers better grow fruits and vegetables. Continue reading Inspiring students to help farmers in developing countries (Apply now!)

New project combines vegetables and livestock in Cambodian farming

A version of this article first appeared on the UC Davis One Health blog

New research supported by the Horticulture Innovation Lab at UC Davis aims to help farmers in Cambodia better integrate growing vegetables, raising livestock and maintaining healthy soil — all in the same place.

“By understanding the interactions between horticulture and livestock systems, we can help farmers make better use of agricultural inputs such as fertilizer and labor, which will help improve a farmer’s bottom line,” says Erin McGuire, associate director of the program, which is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

“Systems thinking” is critical to making a real-world impact in global food security, according to Jessie Vipham, project leader for the new $750,000 project and assistant professor at Kansas State University’s Sustainable Intensification Innovation Lab.

“Too often overlooked is that systems piece, the very fact that these things — crops and livestock, soil health and human health — play together. Continue reading New project combines vegetables and livestock in Cambodian farming

How new apricot research can help farmers and reduce poverty in Tajikistan

Apricots offer farmers in southern Tajikistan a profitable opportunity — particularly when dried for export to foreign markets.

In a region where 10 percent of the population lives on less than $1.25 per day, an international team led by U.S. scientists is digging into a new research project to help, advancing the science behind growing, drying, and selling these golden fruits.

Long history, new opportunities for apricot farmers in Tajikistan

Apricots have a long history in Tajikistan, as part of a region that is rich in apricot biodiversity (and potentially where the fruit originated). While apricots are grown widely across the country, farmers in northern Tajikistan in particular have well established commercial production and drying operations. More than 80 percent of Tajikistan’s dried apricots are exported to Russia, the world’s largest importer of dried fruit.

In 2015 a frost in northern Tajikistan presented southern farmers with a new opportunity. The frost prompted processors to look farther afield for apricots — including to farmers in the country’s southwestern Khatlon province, where Continue reading How new apricot research can help farmers and reduce poverty in Tajikistan