7 ways that gender matters in western Honduras

Editor’s note: This blog post by Janelle Larson was originally a presentation given at the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s 2017 annual meeting in Guatemala.

Larson is an associate professor in agricultural economics at the Pennsylvania State University and leads the Horticulture Innovation Lab project focused on empowering women through horticulture in Honduras.

portrait
Janelle Larson, Penn State associate professor, who leads a Horticulture Innovation Lab project

Gender norms define the roles and responsibilities of women and men at the individual, household, community and societal level. We have found this to be a factor in western Honduras where patriarchy permeates many aspects of life.

Our findings indicate how gender norms influence and pervade seven different key aspects related to our project:

  1. Gender matters in agriculture
    In agriculture production, women’s work is often unrecognized and under compensated. Women’s participation in production — mostly in harvesting and the processing phases of high-value crop chains — is relatively large. According to our household survey conducted in 2016, nearly 20 percent of women in our study area work as day laborers, often for coffee harvest, and approximately 6 percent of women work in their family fields. Women are also heavily involved in home garden production. They are responsible for approximately 54 percent of the activities of home garden production, which is mostly for home consumption.

    Young woman and old woman talking in plastic chairs
    Gender matters in household decision making: A Zamorano graduate interviews a woman as part of a survey of more than 500 households in Western Honduras.

Continue reading 7 ways that gender matters in western Honduras

Grafting team gathers for Wisconsin workshop

The Horticulture Innovation Lab’s “Plántulas de Esperanza” project team gathered in Wisconsin this month for a 9-day workshop focused on vegetable grafting under the leadership of Jim Nienhuis, horticulture professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Among the 28 Spanish-speaking attendees of the workshop were leaders from the women’s farming groups who are participating in the project from Honduras and Guatemala. Also participating were students and professors from the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica. Continue reading Grafting team gathers for Wisconsin workshop