Where we work

Improving nutrition with African indigenous vegetables in Kenya and Zambia

This project's research will support and strengthen African indigenous vegetable industries using a market-first, science-driven approach that connects stakeholders along the value chain. Vegetables will vary within countries based upon market demand and nutritional benefits, potentially including amaranth, moringa, African eggplant, Ethiopian mustard, African nightshade, and spider plant.

Improving nutrition with African indigenous vegetables in Kenya and Zambia

This project's research will support and strengthen African indigenous vegetable industries using a market-first, science-driven approach that connects stakeholders along the value chain. Vegetables will vary within countries based upon market demand and nutritional benefits, potentially including amaranth, moringa, African eggplant, Ethiopian mustard, African nightshade, and spider plant.

Improving nutrition with African indigenous vegetables in Kenya and Zambia

This project's research will support and strengthen African indigenous vegetable industries using a market-first, science-driven approach that connects stakeholders along the value chain. Vegetables will vary within countries based upon market demand and nutritional benefits, potentially including amaranth, moringa, African eggplant, Ethiopian mustard, African nightshade, and spider plant.

Expanding tomato grafting for entrepreneurship in Guatemala and Honduras

In many tropical countries, soilborne pathogens dramatically reduce tomato yields, impacting the livelihoods of rural families. The most limiting soilborne pathogen in the tropics is Ralstonia solanacearum, bacterial wilt.

Expanding tomato grafting for entrepreneurship in Guatemala and Honduras

In many tropical countries, soilborne pathogens dramatically reduce tomato yields, impacting the livelihoods of rural families. The most limiting soilborne pathogen in the tropics is Ralstonia solanacearum, bacterial wilt.

Expanding tomato grafting for entrepreneurship in Guatemala and Honduras

In many tropical countries, soilborne pathogens dramatically reduce tomato yields, impacting the livelihoods of rural families. The most limiting soilborne pathogen in the tropics is Ralstonia solanacearum, bacterial wilt.

Establishing a horticulture center in Guinea

This project's goal is to introduce novel technologies that will improve production practices and reduce postharvest losses in Guinea. These technologies will be delivered through a market-driven and youth-led Horticulture Training and Services Center in Kindia, Guinea.

Producing local, disease-resistant vegetable seed in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua

Acute poverty and meager economic opportunities exist in many rural regions of Central America. Vegetable and seed production are technology-driven economic activities that can significantly contribute to economic growth in communities and families and specifically provide new opportunities that contribute to the economic empowerment of women. The factors limiting this horticultural transformation are access to:

Producing local, disease-resistant vegetable seed in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua

Acute poverty and meager economic opportunities exist in many rural regions of Central America. Vegetable and seed production are technology-driven economic activities that can significantly contribute to economic growth in communities and families and specifically provide new opportunities that contribute to the economic empowerment of women. The factors limiting this horticultural transformation are access to:

Producing local, disease-resistant vegetable seed in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua

Acute poverty and meager economic opportunities exist in many rural regions of Central America. Vegetable and seed production are technology-driven economic activities that can significantly contribute to economic growth in communities and families and specifically provide new opportunities that contribute to the economic empowerment of women. The factors limiting this horticultural transformation are access to:

Producing local, disease-resistant vegetable seed in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua

Acute poverty and meager economic opportunities exist in many rural regions of Central America. Vegetable and seed production are technology-driven economic activities that can significantly contribute to economic growth in communities and families and specifically provide new opportunities that contribute to the economic empowerment of women. The factors limiting this horticultural transformation are access to:

Creating a market niche for 'food-safe' vegetables in Cambodia and Vietnam

The rapid economic growth and population expansion of Cambodian and Vietnam presents opportunities for impacting the livelihood of many people, where horticulture remains an important undeveloped business sector supported by small farmers. This team's goal is to empower small-scale farmers (59% of whom are women) with integrated experiential education and training for sustainable vegetable production that limits postharvest losses, increases food safety, increases market access and, importantly, increases income.

Creating a market niche for 'food-safe' vegetables in Cambodia and Vietnam

The rapid economic growth and population expansion of Cambodian and Vietnam presents opportunities for impacting the livelihood of many people, where horticulture remains an important undeveloped business sector supported by small farmers. This team's goal is to empower small-scale farmers (59% of whom are women) with integrated experiential education and training for sustainable vegetable production that limits postharvest losses, increases food safety, increases market access and, importantly, increases income.

Building safe vegetable value chains in Cambodia

This international project team is focusing efforts on linking small-landholder farmers to other value chain actors, to connect farmer production with market demand. This effort builds on a previously completed Horticulture Innovation Lab project and integrates with the IPM Innovation Lab and other USAID-funded programs to determine how best to cultivate a sustainable safe vegetable value chain to increase food security in Cambodia.

Investigating integrated vegetable-livestock systems in Cambodia

The goal of this project is to understand how integrated animal-horticulture systems are most feasible for smallholders by rigorously addressing — through interdisciplinary research — the potential of these systems with regard to sustainable production capacity, income generation, and gender dimensions.

Investigating integrated vegetable-livestock systems in Cambodia

The goal of this project is to understand how integrated animal-horticulture systems are most feasible for smallholders by rigorously addressing — through interdisciplinary research — the potential of these systems with regard to sustainable production capacity, income generation, and gender dimensions.

Investigating integrated vegetable-livestock systems in Cambodia

The goal of this project is to understand how integrated animal-horticulture systems are most feasible for smallholders by rigorously addressing — through interdisciplinary research — the potential of these systems with regard to sustainable production capacity, income generation, and gender dimensions.

Reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda

In 2014, the Rwandan National Horticulture Strategy estimates that 1 million rural households in Rwanda grow horticultural commodities, "principally for home use and sale. For most rural households, home-produced fruits and vegetables provide an important source of the micro-nutrients necessary for a healthy balanced diet.”

Reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda

In 2014, the Rwandan National Horticulture Strategy estimates that 1 million rural households in Rwanda grow horticultural commodities, "principally for home use and sale. For most rural households, home-produced fruits and vegetables provide an important source of the micro-nutrients necessary for a healthy balanced diet.”

Reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda

In 2014, the Rwandan National Horticulture Strategy estimates that 1 million rural households in Rwanda grow horticultural commodities, "principally for home use and sale. For most rural households, home-produced fruits and vegetables provide an important source of the micro-nutrients necessary for a healthy balanced diet.”

Developing farmer-led irrigation solutions in Uganda

Dry season vegetable production is a high priority in Uganda's largely rainfed (>97%) agricultural systems. Off-season vegetable supplies are currently inadequate to meet human nutritional needs. As rainfall patterns become increasingly unpredictable and rapid population expansion increases pressure on food systems, demand for vegetables will further outstrip supplies.

Developing farmer-led irrigation solutions in Uganda

Dry season vegetable production is a high priority in Uganda's largely rainfed (>97%) agricultural systems. Off-season vegetable supplies are currently inadequate to meet human nutritional needs. As rainfall patterns become increasingly unpredictable and rapid population expansion increases pressure on food systems, demand for vegetables will further outstrip supplies.

Developing a participatory extension model to enhance smallholder production and marketing in Uganda

Although the growing market for horticultural products in Uganda offers an opportunity for smallholder farmers to improve their income, the farmers' access to these markets is still limited. This project develops a participatory extension model to rapidly improve smallholder linkages to horticultural markets, by merging and supplementing two agricultural development models: farmer field schools (FFS) and the participatory market chain approach (PMCA).

Strengthening farmer groups to increase fruit and vegetable production in Uganda

This project facilitates the organization and strengthening of small holder farmer groups in the Nkokonjeru region of Uganda by providing technical training in fruit and vegetable management and improving farmers’ access to simple and innovative production technologies. The specific project objectives are:

Assessing feasibility of pest-exclusion nets in Kenya

Research results show that using AgroNets (also known as Eco-Friendly Nets) in vegetable production leads to increased yields of marketable produce, while simultaneously reducing or eliminating the use of synthetic insecticides. In Kenya, the use of the nets with French bean, tomato and other high-value vegetable crops is of particular interest as this technology can help enhance exporter compliance with European Union requirements of minimum pesticide residue levels.

Assessing feasibility of pest-exclusion nets in Kenya

Research results show that using AgroNets (also known as Eco-Friendly Nets) in vegetable production leads to increased yields of marketable produce, while simultaneously reducing or eliminating the use of synthetic insecticides. In Kenya, the use of the nets with French bean, tomato and other high-value vegetable crops is of particular interest as this technology can help enhance exporter compliance with European Union requirements of minimum pesticide residue levels.

Assessing feasibility of pest-exclusion nets in Kenya

Research results show that using AgroNets (also known as Eco-Friendly Nets) in vegetable production leads to increased yields of marketable produce, while simultaneously reducing or eliminating the use of synthetic insecticides. In Kenya, the use of the nets with French bean, tomato and other high-value vegetable crops is of particular interest as this technology can help enhance exporter compliance with European Union requirements of minimum pesticide residue levels.

Assessing feasibility of pest-exclusion nets in Kenya

Research results show that using AgroNets (also known as Eco-Friendly Nets) in vegetable production leads to increased yields of marketable produce, while simultaneously reducing or eliminating the use of synthetic insecticides. In Kenya, the use of the nets with French bean, tomato and other high-value vegetable crops is of particular interest as this technology can help enhance exporter compliance with European Union requirements of minimum pesticide residue levels.

Assessing feasibility of pest-exclusion nets in Kenya

Research results show that using AgroNets (also known as Eco-Friendly Nets) in vegetable production leads to increased yields of marketable produce, while simultaneously reducing or eliminating the use of synthetic insecticides. In Kenya, the use of the nets with French bean, tomato and other high-value vegetable crops is of particular interest as this technology can help enhance exporter compliance with European Union requirements of minimum pesticide residue levels.

Demonstrating nets and floating row covers in Kenya and Benin

Rapid urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa has resulted in an increase in demand for food, and fruit and vegetable consumption in the region remains 22-82% below the intake value threshold of 400 g/day recommended by the World Health Organization and UN Food and Agricultural Organization. Smallholder vegetable growers are often poor and lack access to inputs for improved germplasm, pest and disease control tools, and improved crop production techniques. Vegetable farms are routinely devastated by pests and extended drought conditions.

Demonstrating nets and floating row covers in Kenya and Benin

Rapid urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa has resulted in an increase in demand for food, and fruit and vegetable consumption in the region remains 22-82% below the intake value threshold of 400 g/day recommended by the World Health Organization and UN Food and Agricultural Organization. Smallholder vegetable growers are often poor and lack access to inputs for improved germplasm, pest and disease control tools, and improved crop production techniques. Vegetable farms are routinely devastated by pests and extended drought conditions.

Empowering women through horticulture in Honduras

In the Western Highlands of Honduras, families struggle to survive on subsistence agriculture. Poverty and malnutrition rates are high, and take a particularly heavy toll on women and children. There are limited prospects for increasing production of traditional crops in the region, as well as few off-farm employment opportunities. High-value horticulture, however, can generate income on limited landholdings, and offers a promising way for women and their families to escape from poverty.

Promoting drip irrigation and climate resilience in Guatemala

Also called MásRiego (More Irrigation), this project develops and implements holistic, business-driven solutions to increase availability of drip irrigation, conservation agriculture and improved water management, while addressing social inclusion, capacity, and asset building for all community members, especially women and youth, in Feed the Future zones of Guatemala.

Promoting drip irrigation and climate resilience in Guatemala

Also called MásRiego (More Irrigation), this project develops and implements holistic, business-driven solutions to increase availability of drip irrigation, conservation agriculture and improved water management, while addressing social inclusion, capacity, and asset building for all community members, especially women and youth, in Feed the Future zones of Guatemala.

Promoting drip irrigation and climate resilience in Guatemala

Also called MásRiego (More Irrigation), this project develops and implements holistic, business-driven solutions to increase availability of drip irrigation, conservation agriculture and improved water management, while addressing social inclusion, capacity, and asset building for all community members, especially women and youth, in Feed the Future zones of Guatemala.

Managing nematodes and soil health in Guatemala

This research team works with smallholder potato farmers in the Western Highlands of Guatemala on integrated technologies for nematode and soil health management, so potato farmers can achieve sustainable yields.

Managing nematodes and soil health in Guatemala

This research team works with smallholder potato farmers in the Western Highlands of Guatemala on integrated technologies for nematode and soil health management, so potato farmers can achieve sustainable yields.

Managing nematodes and soil health in Guatemala

This research team works with smallholder potato farmers in the Western Highlands of Guatemala on integrated technologies for nematode and soil health management, so potato farmers can achieve sustainable yields.

Promoting conservation agriculture for vegetable growers in Cambodia and Nepal

In regions of Cambodia and Nepal, water can be scarce for extended periods, negatively affecting horticultural crop production and food security. Water- and labor-saving technologies, including rainwater harvest and storage, drip irrigation, and conservation agriculture systems, can boost food security and climate-change resiliency. These technologies help to control erosion, increase land productivity, enhance farmer incomes, and improve water quality.  

Promoting conservation agriculture for vegetable growers in Cambodia and Nepal

In regions of Cambodia and Nepal, water can be scarce for extended periods, negatively affecting horticultural crop production and food security. Water- and labor-saving technologies, including rainwater harvest and storage, drip irrigation, and conservation agriculture systems, can boost food security and climate-change resiliency. These technologies help to control erosion, increase land productivity, enhance farmer incomes, and improve water quality.  

Promoting conservation agriculture for vegetable growers in Cambodia and Nepal

In regions of Cambodia and Nepal, water can be scarce for extended periods, negatively affecting horticultural crop production and food security. Water- and labor-saving technologies, including rainwater harvest and storage, drip irrigation, and conservation agriculture systems, can boost food security and climate-change resiliency. These technologies help to control erosion, increase land productivity, enhance farmer incomes, and improve water quality.  

Empowering women vegetable growers with drip irrigation in Cambodia

Horticulture crop production, a woman's domain in parts of Southeast Asia, is plagued by yield losses because of drought and unequal opportunities for women. Among many horticultural technologies, drip irrigation has demonstrated that it can replace time-consuming tasks of hand irrigation and fertilization, while increasing yield, reducing pest problems, and saving water.

Improving practices for dried apricots in Tajikistan

Apricots have the potential to be a high-value crop for smallholder farmers in Tajikistan as the climate, soil, and water in many parts of the country are favorable for apricot production. Dried apricots are an established product in northern Tajikistan, but are new in southern regions of Tajikistan. Drying apricots extends fruit shelf life and marketing opportunities, although drying techniques used widely now consist of rudimentary sulfur treatment, followed by sun drying on road beds, bare ground and stones.

Scaling up seed-drying technology in Bangladesh

Providing smallholder farmers access to high-quality seeds of improved varieties of horticultural crops is fundamental to increasing productivity and incomes. In humid tropical regions, traditional seed production and storage methods without temperature and moisture control result in rapid deterioration of seed quality. Enabling seed companies to dry, store, and package seeds of improved varieties helps provide farmers with sources of high-quality seeds.

Scaling up seed-drying technology in Bangladesh

Providing smallholder farmers access to high-quality seeds of improved varieties of horticultural crops is fundamental to increasing productivity and incomes. In humid tropical regions, traditional seed production and storage methods without temperature and moisture control result in rapid deterioration of seed quality. Enabling seed companies to dry, store, and package seeds of improved varieties helps provide farmers with sources of high-quality seeds.

Examining nutrition impacts of horticultural innovations in Bangladesh

As a collaborator with the Nutrition Innovation Lab at Tufts University, this research team is implementing three horticultural technologies and analyzing the impacts of these interventions on household nutrition and dietary diversity.

Examining nutrition impacts of horticultural innovations in Bangladesh

As a collaborator with the Nutrition Innovation Lab at Tufts University, this research team is implementing three horticultural technologies and analyzing the impacts of these interventions on household nutrition and dietary diversity.

Designing for horticulture development with D-Labs in Honduras and Thailand

Innovative horticultural technologies hold potential to aid in reducing poverty, improving nutrition and health, and improving sustainability and profitability of horticulture activities. The UC Davis D-Lab team works with the Horticulture Innovation Lab's Regional Centers to train students in ongoing innovation processes and design-for-development thinking.

Designing for horticulture development with D-Labs in Honduras and Thailand

Innovative horticultural technologies hold potential to aid in reducing poverty, improving nutrition and health, and improving sustainability and profitability of horticulture activities. The UC Davis D-Lab team works with the Horticulture Innovation Lab's Regional Centers to train students in ongoing innovation processes and design-for-development thinking.

Implementing drying beads for seeds in Asia and Africa

Improving the ability of smallholder farmers to access high-quality seeds of improved varieties of horticultural crops is fundamental to increasing farmer productivity and incomes. Traditional seed production and storage methods in humid tropical regions without temperature and moisture control result in rapid deterioration of seed quality.

Implementing drying beads for seeds in Asia and Africa

Improving the ability of smallholder farmers to access high-quality seeds of improved varieties of horticultural crops is fundamental to increasing farmer productivity and incomes. Traditional seed production and storage methods in humid tropical regions without temperature and moisture control result in rapid deterioration of seed quality.

Implementing drying beads for seeds in Asia and Africa

Improving the ability of smallholder farmers to access high-quality seeds of improved varieties of horticultural crops is fundamental to increasing farmer productivity and incomes. Traditional seed production and storage methods in humid tropical regions without temperature and moisture control result in rapid deterioration of seed quality.

Introducing new seed storage technologies in Nepal, Thailand, India

High quality seeds of improved vegetable varieties are essential to enhance the production of annual horticultural crops. In tropical climates, high temperatures and humid conditions combine to cause rapid deterioration of seeds in open storage, resulting in lost value, poor stand establishment, lowered productivity and a disincentive to invest in improved seeds. Most horticultural seeds in Nepal are locally produced or self-saved and stored without facilities for maintaining dryness that would greatly extend the seed longevity in storage.

Strengthening indigenous seed systems in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam

Informal seed systems provide access to locally adapted indigenous crops and constitute an essential component of sustainable production for resource-poor farmers. Development of these locally valued crops will set the foundation for increased and improved production, marketing and profitability. This project increases efforts to identify, conserve, improve and disseminate this rich genetic resource.

Evaluating local tomato and chili varieties for disease resistance in Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador

This project brings together the technology and biological capital of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the World Vegetable Center, based Taiwan, with the managerial and technical skills of three Central American institutions: CARE, El Salvador; Fundación Hondureña de Investigación Agrícola (FHIA) in collaboration with Fintrac, Honduras; and Universidad Nacional Agraria (UNA), Nicaragua.

Evaluating local tomato and chili varieties for disease resistance in Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador

This project brings together the technology and biological capital of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the World Vegetable Center, based Taiwan, with the managerial and technical skills of three Central American institutions: CARE, El Salvador; Fundación Hondureña de Investigación Agrícola (FHIA) in collaboration with Fintrac, Honduras; and Universidad Nacional Agraria (UNA), Nicaragua.

Evaluating local tomato and chili varieties for disease resistance in Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador

This project brings together the technology and biological capital of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the World Vegetable Center, based Taiwan, with the managerial and technical skills of three Central American institutions: CARE, El Salvador; Fundación Hondureña de Investigación Agrícola (FHIA) in collaboration with Fintrac, Honduras; and Universidad Nacional Agraria (UNA), Nicaragua.

Training plant diagnosticians across Latin America

Plant disease is a limiting factor in agricultural production in Latin America. Diseases are difficult to control due to high rainfall conditions and the presence of a diversity of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Plant pathogens produce a large number of diseases on tropical crops and cause losses estimated to be as high as $30 billion per year. The risk of accidental introduction of Phytophthora species with trade requires continued monitoring and improved diagnostic capabilities.

Training plant diagnosticians across Latin America

Plant disease is a limiting factor in agricultural production in Latin America. Diseases are difficult to control due to high rainfall conditions and the presence of a diversity of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Plant pathogens produce a large number of diseases on tropical crops and cause losses estimated to be as high as $30 billion per year. The risk of accidental introduction of Phytophthora species with trade requires continued monitoring and improved diagnostic capabilities.

Training plant diagnosticians across Latin America

Plant disease is a limiting factor in agricultural production in Latin America. Diseases are difficult to control due to high rainfall conditions and the presence of a diversity of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Plant pathogens produce a large number of diseases on tropical crops and cause losses estimated to be as high as $30 billion per year. The risk of accidental introduction of Phytophthora species with trade requires continued monitoring and improved diagnostic capabilities.

Training plant diagnosticians across Latin America

Plant disease is a limiting factor in agricultural production in Latin America. Diseases are difficult to control due to high rainfall conditions and the presence of a diversity of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Plant pathogens produce a large number of diseases on tropical crops and cause losses estimated to be as high as $30 billion per year. The risk of accidental introduction of Phytophthora species with trade requires continued monitoring and improved diagnostic capabilities.

Training plant diagnosticians across Latin America

Plant disease is a limiting factor in agricultural production in Latin America. Diseases are difficult to control due to high rainfall conditions and the presence of a diversity of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Plant pathogens produce a large number of diseases on tropical crops and cause losses estimated to be as high as $30 billion per year. The risk of accidental introduction of Phytophthora species with trade requires continued monitoring and improved diagnostic capabilities.

Training plant diagnosticians across Latin America

Plant disease is a limiting factor in agricultural production in Latin America. Diseases are difficult to control due to high rainfall conditions and the presence of a diversity of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Plant pathogens produce a large number of diseases on tropical crops and cause losses estimated to be as high as $30 billion per year. The risk of accidental introduction of Phytophthora species with trade requires continued monitoring and improved diagnostic capabilities.

Training plant diagnosticians across Latin America

Plant disease is a limiting factor in agricultural production in Latin America. Diseases are difficult to control due to high rainfall conditions and the presence of a diversity of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Plant pathogens produce a large number of diseases on tropical crops and cause losses estimated to be as high as $30 billion per year. The risk of accidental introduction of Phytophthora species with trade requires continued monitoring and improved diagnostic capabilities.

Improving bell pepper production in passively ventilated structures in Latin America

Bell pepper production in Central America and the Caribbean has become one of the main agricultural commodities for export to the United States and the European Union. To guarantee constant supply and quality, small- and medium-size growers use passively-ventilated protective structures (i.e. greenhouse and high tunnels) to control the growing environment, reduce pests, and improve fruit quality and yields.

Improving bell pepper production in passively ventilated structures in Latin America

Bell pepper production in Central America and the Caribbean has become one of the main agricultural commodities for export to the United States and the European Union. To guarantee constant supply and quality, small- and medium-size growers use passively-ventilated protective structures (i.e. greenhouse and high tunnels) to control the growing environment, reduce pests, and improve fruit quality and yields.

Improving bell pepper production in passively ventilated structures in Latin America

Bell pepper production in Central America and the Caribbean has become one of the main agricultural commodities for export to the United States and the European Union. To guarantee constant supply and quality, small- and medium-size growers use passively-ventilated protective structures (i.e. greenhouse and high tunnels) to control the growing environment, reduce pests, and improve fruit quality and yields.

Improving bell pepper production in passively ventilated structures in Latin America

Bell pepper production in Central America and the Caribbean has become one of the main agricultural commodities for export to the United States and the European Union. To guarantee constant supply and quality, small- and medium-size growers use passively-ventilated protective structures (i.e. greenhouse and high tunnels) to control the growing environment, reduce pests, and improve fruit quality and yields.

Improving bell pepper production in passively ventilated structures in Latin America

Bell pepper production in Central America and the Caribbean has become one of the main agricultural commodities for export to the United States and the European Union. To guarantee constant supply and quality, small- and medium-size growers use passively-ventilated protective structures (i.e. greenhouse and high tunnels) to control the growing environment, reduce pests, and improve fruit quality and yields.

Increasing production of indigenous African leafy vegetables in Kenya

This project enhances the potential for production, utilization and marketing of African leafy vegetables in Eastern Africa. Many indigenous African leafy vegetables contain higher levels of nutrients than commonly grown "exotic" species like Swiss chard, kale and cabbage. Important species consumed include spider plant (Cleome gynandra), African nightshades (Solanum scabrum/S. villosum/S. americanum/S. tarderomotum) and amaranths (Amaranthus blitum/A. dubius/A. hybrdus /A. spinosus).

Testing a gender-tailored extension model in Kenya

Leadership development is key to sustained improvements in agricultural production in developing countries particularly in the rural areas. However the rural poor cannot, in isolation, develop complete solutions to deal with production, market access and technology challenges they face.

Increasing smallholder use of grafting and tunnels for tomatoes and peppers in Kenya

This project provides information and strategies to improve tomato and pepper production through the use of grafting and low/high tunnel technologies among smallholder growers in Kirinyaga District, Kenya.

Testing cell phone-based extension services in India, Nepal and Sri Lanka

Advances in telecommunication technologies and rapid uptake of cell phones by millions of growers provide excellent opportunities for delivering real-time information to growers in rural areas. Taking advantage of these developments, an international team led by Michigan State University (MSU) in partnership with the International Horticulture Innovation and Training Center (IHITC) in India, analyzed the cost-effectiveness of a cell phone-mediated, personalized advisory service for growers cultivating horticulture crops in poly-houses and shade-nets.

Testing cell phone-based extension services in India, Nepal and Sri Lanka

Advances in telecommunication technologies and rapid uptake of cell phones by millions of growers provide excellent opportunities for delivering real-time information to growers in rural areas. Taking advantage of these developments, an international team led by Michigan State University (MSU) in partnership with the International Horticulture Innovation and Training Center (IHITC) in India, analyzed the cost-effectiveness of a cell phone-mediated, personalized advisory service for growers cultivating horticulture crops in poly-houses and shade-nets.

Testing cell phone-based extension services in India, Nepal and Sri Lanka

Advances in telecommunication technologies and rapid uptake of cell phones by millions of growers provide excellent opportunities for delivering real-time information to growers in rural areas. Taking advantage of these developments, an international team led by Michigan State University (MSU) in partnership with the International Horticulture Innovation and Training Center (IHITC) in India, analyzed the cost-effectiveness of a cell phone-mediated, personalized advisory service for growers cultivating horticulture crops in poly-houses and shade-nets.

Establishing GIS data for horticultural projects in Malawi

Led by Darcy Boellstorff of Bridgewater State University, this project's international team is focused on acquiring needed geographic information for use in a geographic information system (GIS) relief work for planning in crop cultivation, irrigation and agribusiness.

Opening a regional postharvest training center in Tanzania

A year of training for postharvest experts from Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, Ghana, Benin and Gabon culminates in the establishment of a model Postharvest and Training Services Center in Tanzania--which the new experts emulate in their home countries.

Opening a regional postharvest training center in Tanzania

A year of training for postharvest experts from Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, Ghana, Benin and Gabon culminates in the establishment of a model Postharvest and Training Services Center in Tanzania--which the new experts emulate in their home countries.

Opening a regional postharvest training center in Tanzania

A year of training for postharvest experts from Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, Ghana, Benin and Gabon culminates in the establishment of a model Postharvest and Training Services Center in Tanzania--which the new experts emulate in their home countries.

Opening a regional postharvest training center in Tanzania

A year of training for postharvest experts from Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, Ghana, Benin and Gabon culminates in the establishment of a model Postharvest and Training Services Center in Tanzania--which the new experts emulate in their home countries.

Opening a regional postharvest training center in Tanzania

A year of training for postharvest experts from Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, Ghana, Benin and Gabon culminates in the establishment of a model Postharvest and Training Services Center in Tanzania--which the new experts emulate in their home countries.

Opening a regional postharvest training center in Tanzania

A year of training for postharvest experts from Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, Ghana, Benin and Gabon culminates in the establishment of a model Postharvest and Training Services Center in Tanzania--which the new experts emulate in their home countries.

Improving postharvest practices with local market support in Zambia

The goal of this project is to further extend economic opportunities to small-scale farmers near Livingstone, Zambia.

Improving vegetable quality with local market support in Zambia

This international team aims to increase food security and increase income for rural farmers through quality production of vegetables. Activities enables communities to access appropriate germplasm and involve them in the production, postharvest handling and commercialization of high-value produce to diversify their incomes. Growers are introduced to and trained in greenhouse tunnel construction and systems to produce vegetables in open field and under controlled greenhouse conditions.

Improving marketing capacity for specialty crops in Ghana

This project expands economic opportunities for small-scale farmers in Ghana by enhancing their productivity and deepening market access and participation. The specific objectives of the project include:

Evaluating cooling and drying technologies in various climates in Tanzania, Ghana, Honduras, Guatemala, Thailand

This research project is a series of studies comparing cool storage tools and solar dryer designs. The technologies will be tested in eight locations across four different zones of relative humidity and temperature, with Horticulture Innovation Lab affiliates in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

For cool storage, the studies will include the zero-energy cool chamber (PDF) compared to ambient air storage, under a variety of combinations of high/low temperatures and high/low relative humidity conditions.

Evaluating cooling and drying technologies in various climates in Tanzania, Ghana, Honduras, Guatemala, Thailand

This research project is a series of studies comparing cool storage tools and solar dryer designs. The technologies will be tested in eight locations across four different zones of relative humidity and temperature, with Horticulture Innovation Lab affiliates in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

For cool storage, the studies will include the zero-energy cool chamber (PDF) compared to ambient air storage, under a variety of combinations of high/low temperatures and high/low relative humidity conditions.

Evaluating cooling and drying technologies in various climates in Tanzania, Ghana, Honduras, Guatemala, Thailand

This research project is a series of studies comparing cool storage tools and solar dryer designs. The technologies will be tested in eight locations across four different zones of relative humidity and temperature, with Horticulture Innovation Lab affiliates in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

For cool storage, the studies will include the zero-energy cool chamber (PDF) compared to ambient air storage, under a variety of combinations of high/low temperatures and high/low relative humidity conditions.

Evaluating cooling and drying technologies in various climates in Tanzania, Ghana, Honduras, Guatemala, Thailand

This research project is a series of studies comparing cool storage tools and solar dryer designs. The technologies will be tested in eight locations across four different zones of relative humidity and temperature, with Horticulture Innovation Lab affiliates in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

For cool storage, the studies will include the zero-energy cool chamber (PDF) compared to ambient air storage, under a variety of combinations of high/low temperatures and high/low relative humidity conditions.

Evaluating cooling and drying technologies in various climates in Tanzania, Ghana, Honduras, Guatemala, Thailand

This research project is a series of studies comparing cool storage tools and solar dryer designs. The technologies will be tested in eight locations across four different zones of relative humidity and temperature, with Horticulture Innovation Lab affiliates in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

For cool storage, the studies will include the zero-energy cool chamber (PDF) compared to ambient air storage, under a variety of combinations of high/low temperatures and high/low relative humidity conditions.

Developing training materials to improve postharvest practices in Honduras and Guatemala

Knowledge of postharvest handling practices necessary to satisfy market requirements limits the success of small-scale producers of horticultural crops to participate in the value chain at various levels. Improving the ability of smallholder farmers to produce horticultural crops with the required levels of quality and safety for markets supports the Feed the Future strategy for Honduras and Guatemala by improving growers' income and increasing availability of nutrient-rich foods.

Developing a concentrated solar dryer in Tanzania

Women carry out most production of horticultural crops in Tanzania and other developing countries. Harvest periods are short but less than 1% of the crop is processed for off-season consumption. Previous attempts at establishing solar drying have been unsuccessful due to their expense, low throughput capacity and inability to operate in cloudy environments.

Developing a postharvest alternative to fungicide in Sri Lanka

This project brings together two parallel research programs for collaboration — one in Sri Lanka using natural coating and herbal extracts and another in Hawaii to use natural epiphytic microorganisms to control postharvest diseases.

Demonstrating low-cost cooling technology in Uganda, Honduras and India

Temperature management is the key tool for reducing postharvest losses in the developing world. Very few smallholder farmers have access to cooling or cool storage facilities, and refrigerated transportation is a rarity. The unreliability of local electricity supplies, the expense of conventional coolers, and the lack of technical expertise for the installation and maintenance all have led to the search for alternative solutions such as evaporative cooling systems.

Demonstrating low-cost cooling technology in Uganda, Honduras and India

Temperature management is the key tool for reducing postharvest losses in the developing world. Very few smallholder farmers have access to cooling or cool storage facilities, and refrigerated transportation is a rarity. The unreliability of local electricity supplies, the expense of conventional coolers, and the lack of technical expertise for the installation and maintenance all have led to the search for alternative solutions such as evaporative cooling systems.

Demonstrating low-cost cooling technology in Uganda, Honduras and India

Temperature management is the key tool for reducing postharvest losses in the developing world. Very few smallholder farmers have access to cooling or cool storage facilities, and refrigerated transportation is a rarity. The unreliability of local electricity supplies, the expense of conventional coolers, and the lack of technical expertise for the installation and maintenance all have led to the search for alternative solutions such as evaporative cooling systems.

Strengthening local expertise in postharvest practices in Cambodia and Vietnam

Postharvest losses of fruits and vegetables in Vietnam and Cambodia are very high. In Vietnam, postharvest losses are estimated at 20-25 percent for fruits and more than 30 percent for vegetables. Cambodian vegetable losses have been reported at higher rates than in Vietnam. Postharvest losses include not only quantitative losses, but also losses in quality caused by improper handling and contamination from microbes and pesticides that impacts the nutritional value and safety of fresh produce.

Strengthening local expertise in postharvest practices in Cambodia and Vietnam

Postharvest losses of fruits and vegetables in Vietnam and Cambodia are very high. In Vietnam, postharvest losses are estimated at 20-25 percent for fruits and more than 30 percent for vegetables. Cambodian vegetable losses have been reported at higher rates than in Vietnam. Postharvest losses include not only quantitative losses, but also losses in quality caused by improper handling and contamination from microbes and pesticides that impacts the nutritional value and safety of fresh produce.

Delivering food safety education through social networks in Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua

Contamination of vegetables with foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms results in foodborne illness and economic losses. This problem is worldwide, but is particularly serious in Central American countries that are already fighting problems due to poor nutrition and poverty. Despite the potential magnitude of the problem, small-scale Latin American farmers are generally unaware of these hazards and losses and how these risks can be prevented.

Delivering food safety education through social networks in Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua

Contamination of vegetables with foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms results in foodborne illness and economic losses. This problem is worldwide, but is particularly serious in Central American countries that are already fighting problems due to poor nutrition and poverty. Despite the potential magnitude of the problem, small-scale Latin American farmers are generally unaware of these hazards and losses and how these risks can be prevented.

Delivering food safety education through social networks in Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua

Contamination of vegetables with foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms results in foodborne illness and economic losses. This problem is worldwide, but is particularly serious in Central American countries that are already fighting problems due to poor nutrition and poverty. Despite the potential magnitude of the problem, small-scale Latin American farmers are generally unaware of these hazards and losses and how these risks can be prevented.

Improving tomato production through local GAPs in Nigeria

This project enhances regional and international trade in Nigerian tomatoes by developing a science-based good agricultural practices (GAPs) curriculum and training programs to improve production, food safety and phytosanitary compliance.

Increasing food safety through a regional consortium in Bangladesh and India

The horticulture sector in Bangladesh produces 3.2 million metric tons per year, but small-scale farmers suffer economic losses due to lack of high-yielding varieties, postharvest technologies, food safety issues and processing facilities. Among these issues, food safety problems from chemical and microbial contaminiation and unhygienic facilities affect the marketable produce, food quality and human health. Postharvest losses in Bangladesh are 38 percent, which accounts for significant potential income loss mostly to small-scale farmers, the majority of whom are women.

Strengthening the value chain for African indigenous vegetables in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia

This research project seeks to support and strengthen the African indigenous vegetable industry using a market-first approach to overcoming constraints along the value chain, leading to improved production practices, supply, postharvest handling, distribution and consumer acceptance of African indigenous vegetables in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia.

Strengthening the value chain for African indigenous vegetables in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia

This research project seeks to support and strengthen the African indigenous vegetable industry using a market-first approach to overcoming constraints along the value chain, leading to improved production practices, supply, postharvest handling, distribution and consumer acceptance of African indigenous vegetables in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia.

Strengthening the value chain for African indigenous vegetables in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia

This research project seeks to support and strengthen the African indigenous vegetable industry using a market-first approach to overcoming constraints along the value chain, leading to improved production practices, supply, postharvest handling, distribution and consumer acceptance of African indigenous vegetables in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia.

Evaluating support for smallholder production of paprika and tomatoes in Zimbabwe

Political unrest and economic turmoil in Zimbabwe in the first decade of the 21st Century has destroyed agricultural export industries and the country's emerging smallholder horticulture sector. The adoption of a stable currency and a unity government awakens hope that small-scale farmers can be stimulated to participate in production of horticultural export and locally marketed crops.

Evaluating support for smallholder production of paprika and tomatoes in Zimbabwe

Political unrest and economic turmoil in Zimbabwe in the first decade of the 21st Century has destroyed agricultural export industries and the country's emerging smallholder horticulture sector. The adoption of a stable currency and a unity government awakens hope that small-scale farmers can be stimulated to participate in production of horticultural export and locally marketed crops.

Strengthening the value chain for orange and purple sweet potatoes in Ghana

In Ghana, the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency is high among children and pregnant women — and contributes to one in three of child deaths between the ages of 6 to 59 months. Sweet potato is considered an excellent food security crop in sub-Saharan Africa. White sweet potatoes mostly consumed are very low in beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A.

Strengthening the value chain for orange and purple sweet potatoes in Ghana

In Ghana, the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency is high among children and pregnant women — and contributes to one in three of child deaths between the ages of 6 to 59 months. Sweet potato is considered an excellent food security crop in sub-Saharan Africa. White sweet potatoes mostly consumed are very low in beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A.

Strengthening the value chain for orange and purple sweet potatoes in Ghana

In Ghana, the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency is high among children and pregnant women — and contributes to one in three of child deaths between the ages of 6 to 59 months. Sweet potato is considered an excellent food security crop in sub-Saharan Africa. White sweet potatoes mostly consumed are very low in beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A.

Increasing nutrients in traditional diets with orange-fleshed sweet potatoes in Ghana

Leading forms of malnutrition in developing countries are iron deficiency anemia and vitamin A deficiency, linked to lack of consumption of dark green leafy and orange vegetables. Rural farmers, specifically women, suffer from combined effects of low incomes and nutritional deficiencies. 

Increasing nutrients in traditional diets with orange-fleshed sweet potatoes in Ghana

Leading forms of malnutrition in developing countries are iron deficiency anemia and vitamin A deficiency, linked to lack of consumption of dark green leafy and orange vegetables. Rural farmers, specifically women, suffer from combined effects of low incomes and nutritional deficiencies. 

Increasing nutrients in traditional diets with orange-fleshed sweet potatoes in Ghana

Leading forms of malnutrition in developing countries are iron deficiency anemia and vitamin A deficiency, linked to lack of consumption of dark green leafy and orange vegetables. Rural farmers, specifically women, suffer from combined effects of low incomes and nutritional deficiencies. 

Expanding the floral industry in Honduras

Led by Alan Bennett of UC Davis, this international team supports the ornamental business in Honduras as a means to drive development of a local high-value industry, increase trade, and develop policy, training and infrastructure to support the region’s agricultural productivity.

Expanding the floral industry in Honduras

Led by Alan Bennett of UC Davis, this international team supports the ornamental business in Honduras as a means to drive development of a local high-value industry, increase trade, and develop policy, training and infrastructure to support the region’s agricultural productivity.

Integrating Rooibos tea farmers with fair-trade markets in South Africa

The rapid growth of Fair Trade certification offers the potential for empowering small-scale farmers via access to high-value markets and support for community development and sustainable production. In South Africa, Fair Trade can help combat acute racial and gender inequalities, building on post-Apartheid policies and non-governmental initiatives in agriculture. While some smallholder farmers have increased their well-being through Fair Trade, emerging black farmers historically excluded from land- and market access have yet to gain entry into these beneficial networks.

Developing energy solutions for horticultural production in Honduras and Thailand

Among the most promising disruptive technologies for application to horticulture are those that address the uses of energy in the production, marketing, and processing of horticultural crops. This project tests a range of sustainable energy solutions, and to deploy the most promising at the Horticulture Innovation Lab's Regional Centers.

Technologies considered for testing include:

Developing energy solutions for horticultural production in Honduras and Thailand

Among the most promising disruptive technologies for application to horticulture are those that address the uses of energy in the production, marketing, and processing of horticultural crops. This project tests a range of sustainable energy solutions, and to deploy the most promising at the Horticulture Innovation Lab's Regional Centers.

Technologies considered for testing include:

Improving postharvest practices for tomatoes in Burkina Faso

The project is aimed at improving postharvest handling, storage, processing and marketing of tomatoes in Burkina Faso. Tomatoes are an important crop for increasing household resilience and nutrition. However, the farming of tomatoes is largely at a subsistence level and farmers face many challenges, in particular low bargaining power due to a supply glut.

Building postharvest capacity in Tanzania

Postharvest losses of fresh horticultural crops are a major challenge in Tanzania, with studies from Sokoine University of Agriculture estimating losses of fresh produce at 44-60 percent. According to the Tanzania Horticulture Association (TAHA), horticulture is one of the country's fastest growing agriculture subsectors with 8-10 percent increase per year and approximately 450,000 Tanzanians employed, so reducing postharvest loses of horticultural crops will contribute significantly to economic growth of the country.

Building postharvest capacity in Tanzania

Postharvest losses of fresh horticultural crops are a major challenge in Tanzania, with studies from Sokoine University of Agriculture estimating losses of fresh produce at 44-60 percent. According to the Tanzania Horticulture Association (TAHA), horticulture is one of the country's fastest growing agriculture subsectors with 8-10 percent increase per year and approximately 450,000 Tanzanians employed, so reducing postharvest loses of horticultural crops will contribute significantly to economic growth of the country.

Building postharvest capacity in Tanzania

Postharvest losses of fresh horticultural crops are a major challenge in Tanzania, with studies from Sokoine University of Agriculture estimating losses of fresh produce at 44-60 percent. According to the Tanzania Horticulture Association (TAHA), horticulture is one of the country's fastest growing agriculture subsectors with 8-10 percent increase per year and approximately 450,000 Tanzanians employed, so reducing postharvest loses of horticultural crops will contribute significantly to economic growth of the country.

Countries where we work

The Horticulture Innovation Lab works primarily in countries prioritized by Feed the Future, the U.S. government's global hunger and food security initiative. The map above includes points related to locations of all of the program's research projects. Listed below are countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America that include current locations of Horticulture Innovation Lab projects. When you visit these country pages, you will also find the program's partners, information products, and news articles related to that country.